International Ministries

Gutierrez - International Ministries The latest from Anita and Rick Gutierrez https://internationalministries.org/teams/66-gutierrez.rss Ebola Update <p class="MsoNormal">When our mentor Daniel Fountain served in the Congo in 1995 there was an Ebola Virus Disease outbreak starting in Kikwit which eventually killed 240 out of 300 people infected once the virus spread from village people to the hospital setting. Many health care workers died.&nbsp; This disease was first noticed about 40 years ago, and the recent West African outbreak from December 2013 to June 2016 was the first to get to major cities and threaten the health care systems of three nations while killing 40 percent of people infected for a total of over 10,000 horrible deaths. In Liberia 10% of the health care workers died, and many hospitals and clinics needed to be closed. In October 2014, with funding from One Great Hour of Sharing, we began work on the animation Understanding Ebola: Prevention, Symptoms and Treatment with funding from &nbsp;Here is the link for internet: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGi2paf-Mu0">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGi2paf-Mu0</a> Over time this animation has climbed to third position for Ebola animations on YouTube showing that people found it useful.<o:p></o:p></p><p class="MsoNormal">Good news about Ebola? The results of a vaccination trial by Merck done in Guinea tested 6000 people who were vaccinated with the rVSV-ZEBOV vaccine.&nbsp; The stunning result is that all the people vaccinated early after exposure to a person with Ebola virus were protected from infection, and that that vaccine is safe. It also seems to protect contacts who were not vaccinated, known as herd immunity. Even though further work will need to be done, 300,000 doses have been stockpiled, against the day when Ebola virus is detected again in Africa or elsewhere. For the first time, a vaccine now exists which will help stop the next outbreak from infecting many more people in major cities. <o:p></o:p></p><p> </p><p class="MsoNormal">Looking back on this tragedy, we see the result of what happens when we work together and find solutions. Now instead of desperation and hiding people away, the next outbreak will be met with effective vaccination.&nbsp; From the days of Edward Jenner, dairymaids and pock-free faces with vaccination it took about 200 years to end smallpox. Could Ebola be ended in four decades since its discovery by vaccination? We hope so!&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></p> Mon, 02 Jan 2017 10:23:18 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/64104-ebola-update https://internationalministries.org/read/64104-ebola-update Obesity: A Global Problem <p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:Calibri;mso-default-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;mso-latin-font-family:Calibri;mso-greek-font-family: Calibri;mso-cyrillic-font-family:Calibri;mso-armenian-font-family:Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family:Calibri;mso-arabic-font-family:Arial;mso-currency-font-family: Calibri;mso-latinext-font-family:Calibri;color:#444444;mso-style-textfill-type: solid;mso-style-textfill-fill-color:#444444;mso-style-textfill-fill-alpha:100%; language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">Once common only in wealthy nations, obesity now is on an alarming rise in underdeveloped countries as well.&nbsp; </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:Calibri;mso-default-font-family: Calibri;mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;mso-latin-font-family:Calibri;mso-greek-font-family: Calibri;mso-cyrillic-font-family:Calibri;mso-armenian-font-family:Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family:Calibri;mso-arabic-font-family:Arial;mso-currency-font-family: Calibri;mso-latinext-font-family:Calibri;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Globally, obesity rates have doubled since 1980. The map of the world and graphs (source: Gretchen Stevens and Majid Ezzati, Population and Health Metrics) show the percentage of people that are overweight or obese in various countries.&nbsp; The map shows that six out of every 10 South Africans are overweight. The numbers in the yellow boxes indicate the percent increase since 1980.&nbsp; </span><span lang="en-ZA" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:Calibri;mso-default-font-family: Calibri;mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;mso-latin-font-family:Calibri;mso-greek-font-family: Calibri;mso-cyrillic-font-family:Calibri;mso-armenian-font-family:Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family:Calibri;mso-arabic-font-family:Arial;mso-currency-font-family: Calibri;mso-latinext-font-family:Calibri;language:en-ZA;mso-ansi-language:en-ZA; mso-ligatures:none">The graph shows obesity rates rising in men and women from 1980 to 2008 in selected countries.&nbsp; In 1980,&nbsp; ten percent of&nbsp; men in the United were obese.&nbsp; By 2008, thirty percent of American men were obese.&nbsp; In South Africa over the same time period, obesity in men went from 5% to 25%.&nbsp; Similar trends in other countries are evident.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="en-ZA" style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri;">Many people are in denial about the serious risks to their health due to their lifestyles and are too busy just trying to make it through each day.&nbsp;&nbsp; Even for those who are prepared to make changes there is so much conflicting information that it makes it difficult to know what to do.&nbsp; In South Africa, many of the Zulus that we work with are completely unaware that obesity poses any health risks at all.&nbsp; </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:Calibri;mso-default-font-family: Calibri;mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;mso-latin-font-family:Calibri;mso-greek-font-family: Calibri;mso-cyrillic-font-family:Calibri;mso-armenian-font-family:Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family:Calibri;mso-arabic-font-family:Arial;mso-currency-font-family: Calibri;mso-latinext-font-family:Calibri;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none"><o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="en-ZA" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:Calibri;mso-default-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;mso-latin-font-family:Calibri;mso-greek-font-family: Calibri;mso-cyrillic-font-family:Calibri;mso-armenian-font-family:Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family:Calibri;mso-arabic-font-family:Arial;mso-currency-font-family: Calibri;mso-latinext-font-family:Calibri;language:en-ZA;mso-ansi-language:en-ZA; mso-ligatures:none">We are updating our health builder training manual and presently expanding the sections on obesity and healthy eating.&nbsp; </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:Calibri;mso-default-font-family: Calibri;mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;mso-latin-font-family:Calibri;mso-greek-font-family: Calibri;mso-cyrillic-font-family:Calibri;mso-armenian-font-family:Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family:Calibri;mso-arabic-font-family:Arial;mso-currency-font-family: Calibri;mso-latinext-font-family:Calibri;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">The training manual is being translated into Zulu. </span><span lang="en-ZA" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:Calibri;mso-default-font-family: Calibri;mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;mso-latin-font-family:Calibri;mso-greek-font-family: Calibri;mso-cyrillic-font-family:Calibri;mso-armenian-font-family:Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family:Calibri;mso-arabic-font-family:Arial;mso-currency-font-family: Calibri;mso-latinext-font-family:Calibri;language:en-ZA;mso-ansi-language:en-ZA; mso-ligatures:none">Health builders invite their family and neighbors to meet regularly to support each other and hold each other accountable as they work together to become healthier in mind, body and spirit. </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:Calibri;mso-default-font-family: Calibri;mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;mso-latin-font-family:Calibri;mso-greek-font-family: Calibri;mso-cyrillic-font-family:Calibri;mso-armenian-font-family:Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family:Calibri;mso-arabic-font-family:Arial;mso-currency-font-family: Calibri;mso-latinext-font-family:Calibri;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">This can help people to succeed in improving their health despite the high odds of failure.&nbsp; <o:p></o:p></span></p><p> </p><p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="en-US">&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p> Sun, 14 Feb 2016 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/61265-obesity-a-global-problem https://internationalministries.org/read/61265-obesity-a-global-problem Ebola Prevention Video Developed by IM Missionaries <p> <font face="Cambria">The Ebola epidemic hit West Africa last year with devastating consequences. More than 10,000 people died in 2014 as a result of the widespread outbreak, according to the World Health Organization. </font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">While the spread of this highly-contagious disease has now been largely contained, one big question remains: What steps can be taken now to prevent more outbreaks?</font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">American Baptist International Ministries (IM) medical missionaries <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/teams/66-gutierrez">Drs. Rick and Anita Gutierrez</a> in South Africa have recently produced a powerful solution through their nonprofit organization, Bethel Health Builders.</font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">“The sudden thought came to me very definitely: ‘We have to make an Ebola video,'” says Anita Gutierrez.</font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">“We knew that an animated&nbsp; video would facilitate translation into other languages. It would transmit the facts about Ebola in a culturally sensitive way to people in Sub-Saharan Africa and provide a powerful tool in our ability to prevent and contain Ebola outbreaks,” Anita Gutierrez adds.</font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">The 10-minute video, now available on </font><a href="https://youtu.be/rGi2paf-Mu0"><font color="#0563c1" face="Cambria">YouTube</font></a><font face="Cambria">, uses simple animated visuals and nontechnical language to explain how to help prevent the disease, what symptoms to watch for and what steps to take should one contract the disease.</font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">The video was funded by an Ebola Disaster Relief grant from American Baptists’ donations to One Great Hour of Sharing. It has been translated into French with funding from both the <span style="mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;">Cooperative Baptist Fellowship and Canadian Baptist Ministries</span>. Additional translations into other languages will be made as needed, says Anita Gutierrez.</font><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><font face="Cambria">&nbsp;</font></b></p><p> </p><p align="center" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; text-align: center;"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><font face="Cambria">Building on success</font></b></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">This isn’t the first potentially life-saving animated video created by the Gutierrezes, who have been IM medical missionaries in Durban, South Africa, since 2002, where they work with the Baptist Mission of South Africa, an IM partner.</font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">In 2011, the Gutierrezes created an animated video series about HIV testing, prevention and treatment in English and Zulu. The videos have received an overwhelmingly positive response, with 1.5 million hits on </font><a href="https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLG-d2pZsrMc_Va581h1uYcrEzKeKyqlx-"><font color="#0563c1" face="Cambria">YouTube</font></a><font face="Cambria">.</font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">As a result of the video series, one community health worker in rural Zululand commented, “The people, they understand HIV now,” quotes Anita Gutierrez. “Other health educators from McCord Hospital in Durban noted that the words used in the translation clearly and respectfully convey the information and that their grandmother could watch it and not feel offended.” </font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">“The videos are used in home visits and young children often watch the videos too,” Anita Gutierrez adds. “We worked hard to help move people from a paralyzing sense of fear of HIV to a sense that they can do things to prevent or live a normal life with it.”</font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">The Gutierrezes plan to include the HIV video whenever they distribute the Ebola video.</font></p><p> </p><p align="center" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; text-align: center;"><b><font face="Cambria">Bethel Health Builders: A Broad-based Holistic Health Ministry</font></b></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">&nbsp;</font><font face="Cambria">In their ministry, Drs. Anita and Rick Gutierrez use a holistic approach with a Christian perspective to train and equip health builders of all faith backgrounds to screen for and offer education about common chronic medical conditions in their communities, as well as referring patients to more advanced medical facilities as necessary.</font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">The Gutierrezes have also developed a video series that can be studied individually or in small groups in the community, covering such topics as high blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, heart disease, stroke, nutrition and exercise. A skills training video series enables health builders to train other health builders in screening for obesity, glucose, blood pressure and HIV under the supervision of health care workers. </font></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><font face="Cambria">“We have found that equipping lay people with animated educational videos in their home language is well worth the initial investment and is far more effective, detailed and accurate than verbal presentations by laypersons,” says Anita Gutierrez.&nbsp;“At first we used DVD players, but we are now providing our health builders tablets loaded with videos and other educational resources.”</font></p><p><font face="Cambria"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 10pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-theme-font: minor-latin;">One Great Hour of Sharing</span></b><span style="font-size: 10pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-theme-font: minor-latin;"> is administered by the World Relief Committee of the Board of General Ministries of American Baptist Churches USA. The Committee facilitates American Baptist emergency relief, disaster rehabilitation, refugee work, and development assistance by establishing policy guidelines and overseeing distribution of the annual One Great Hour of Sharing offering received by churches. Learn more: http://www.abc-oghs.org/ </span></font></p><p> </p> Mon, 18 May 2015 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/58488-ebola-prevention-video-developed-by-im-missionaries- https://internationalministries.org/read/58488-ebola-prevention-video-developed-by-im-missionaries- Service Works <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Ephesians 4:12 to prepare God’s people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up<o:p></o:p></b></p><p class="MsoNormal">Last week we had an outbreak of violence here in Durban and surrounding areas.&nbsp; Here is an excerpt from a CNN report:<o:p></o:p></p><p class="MsoNormal"><i>“(CNN)More than 2,000 people fled to South African police stations Thursday after mobs with machetes attacked immigrants in Durban, leaving at least five people dead, an aid group said. Heavily armed police have scrambled to stop clashes this week after local residents accused immigrants from other African nations of taking their jobs.”</i><o:p></o:p></p><p class="MsoNormal">Our health builder Manozi broke down in tears over this during our visit with her last week, so we prayed together. &nbsp;What are we doing long term to change the underlying problem? <o:p></o:p></p><p class="MsoNormal">You have helped us to train and equip skilled working people for 12 years. These health builders are able to address common diseases like HIV/AIDS, diabetes and others which decrease a person’s ability to work and care for themselves. &nbsp;The economic impact of these skills and tests are greatly multiplied. Our recently produced Ebola animations will prevent future infections and economic fallout from that virus as well. This theme of healing via the love of Jesus and bringing hope and skills are played out in our ministry over years and nations. We join hands with others of various faiths to tackle these shared problems. <o:p></o:p></p><p class="MsoNormal">These past three years we have trained and equipped dozens in the vital skills of raising and marketing valuable chickens and quail for protein and profit. This leads to self-employment and provides a peaceful way for groups to meet economic and nutritional needs. <o:p></o:p></p><p> </p><p class="MsoNormal">We cannot fix the world but we can obey the words of Jesus who told to us to love our neighbors and share what we have. The most valuable thing we have besides the gospel are the skills we can share to give others a path to a better life, health and self-employment. Thank you again for investing in our shared effort to make a better life for those we are able to work with. All these efforts require one person to train and equip another. You are the first link on this unbroken chain. &nbsp;<o:p></o:p></p> Sun, 19 Apr 2015 22:56:21 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/57932-service-works https://internationalministries.org/read/57932-service-works Additional $120,000 to Fight Ebola - Financial Contributions Still Urgently Needed <p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">The ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa shows no signs of waning. Beyond the medical challenge, the need for food is growing every day. Since December 2013, Liberia, Guinea, Nigeria and Sierra Leone have reported 8,011 suspected and confirmed cases. New cases continue to be recorded, indicating that the outbreak, which has an overall fatality rate of 55%, has not been contained. <!--?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /--><!--?xml:namespace prefix = o /--><o:p></o:p></font></span></p> <p> <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 14pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">A special $120,000 emergency response grant has been authorized by ABC World Relief Committee <o:p></o:p></font></span></b></p><p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">In its meeting on October 22, the American Baptist World Relief Committee approved an emergency grant of $120,000 from One Great Hour of Sharing (OGHS) for American Baptist International Ministries (IM) to help partners address the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. “In addition to huge medical needs, food security has become a major issue,” stated Lisa Rothenberger, ABC’s World Relief Officer. <o:p></o:p></font></span></p><p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">“People have been unable to go to work at the same time as food prices have increased and access to marketplaces has become more limited. The combined impact for the people in the 3 affected countries is that many are now having trouble feeding their families. Our Liberian partners have shared their fear that more people will die of hunger than Ebola---that is something we need to respond to now,” Rothenberger continued. <o:p></o:p></font></span></p><p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">$120,000 in undesignated funds donated through American Baptist Churches to OGHS will be invested in the work of IM partners: Liberia Baptist Missionary and Educational Convention, Liberia Direct Baptist Missionary Conference, Baptist World Aid and IMA World Health. <o:p></o:p></font></span></p><p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">Approximately 70% will be used to provide food and medical supplies, while the remaining 30% will focus on Ebola prevention. Half of the prevention funds will be used by IM missionary Rick Gutierrez to produce an animated Ebola prevention video based upon his highly acclaimed and widely viewed HIV prevention video. The video will be easily translated into many African languages. <o:p></o:p></font></span></p><p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">This new $120,000 emergency grant comes in addition to the initial August 2014 grant of $20,000 in OGHS funds. <o:p></o:p></font></span></p><p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">Rothenberger shared, “All of these initiatives are in need of additional funding. Through the $120,000 made available by the World Relief Committee last week, we are able to provide significant support, but each partner has needs that far outweigh our initial assistance. Any additional funds contributed will be used to expand our support to our partners response.” <o:p></o:p></font></span></p><p> <font face="Calibri"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;">Congregations and individuals are encouraged to give to the ongoing Ebola-relief efforts</span></b><span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"> through normal denominational channels (through the church’s Monthly Report of Mission Support, designating their gift to “One Great Hour of Sharing: Ebola Outbreak”). They may also <a href="http://internationalministries.org/drives/22">give online here</a> or send a check marked "OGHS - Ebola Outbreak" on the memo line to “International Ministries, P.O. Box 851, Valley Forge, PA 19482.” <o:p></o:p></span></font></p><p> <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 14pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">IM missionaries in Liberia have been temporarily re-assigned to serve in Hungary <o:p></o:p></font></span></b></p><p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">Since March of 2014, Rebecca and Larry Stanton have been serving as IM missionaries in Liberia, assigned to the Ricks Institute. Due to the rapid spread of Ebola and the danger it presents, when the Stantons came to the U.S. this summer for IM's 200th anniversary events, Ricks Institute leadership asked the Stantons and their three younger children to extend their time away from Liberia. In light of the continuing epidemic, IM is honoring that partner request by temporarily reassigning the Stantons to serve in Hungary. <o:p></o:p></font></span></p><p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">Starting November 1, Larry and Rebecca will serve for one year with IM partners, the Hungarian Baptist Union/Hungarian Baptist Aid. Rebecca will teach English to elementary and high school students. Larry will assist with building and grounds maintenance at schools under supervision of our partners. <o:p></o:p></font></span></p><p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">Charles Jones, IM’s Area Director for Europe, the Middle East and Liberia, says, “We are grateful to God and thankful to our Hungarian Baptist partners for providing this opportunity for Larry and Becky to continue to fulfill their calling to cross-cultural, international missionary service! We are concerned for the people of Liberia and West Africa; and we pray that Larry and Becky will be able to return to Liberia in due time. Meanwhile, we pray God’s grace and blessings on them and their children as they transition to life and ministry in another new land and culture.” <o:p></o:p></font></span></p><p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">“We feel this is our Macedonian call,” commented Rebecca in a recent journal. “In the 16th chapter of Acts, Paul and his companions were prevented from going into Asia. Paul had a vision in the night of a man from Macedonia saying, ‘Come over here and help us!’ <o:p></o:p></font></span></p><p> <span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><font face="Calibri">“We have been prevented from going back into Liberia at this time,” she continued. “We are heart-broken for our friends but praying steadily that God will continue to protect the Ricks campus from the Ebola outbreak. As we have been waiting, dumb-founded that our short missionary careers would be stymied, God was working.” <o:p></o:p></font></span></p><p> <font face="Calibri"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;">One Great Hour of Sharing</span></b><span style="font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"> is administered by the World Relief Committee of the Board of General Ministries of American Baptist Churches USA. The Committee facilitates American Baptist emergency relief, disaster rehabilitation, refugee work and development assistance by establishing policy guidelines and overseeing distribution of the annual One Great Hour of Sharing offering received by churches. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p><p> </p> Sun, 26 Oct 2014 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/56174-additional-120-000-to-fight-ebola-financial-contributions-still-urgently-needed https://internationalministries.org/read/56174-additional-120-000-to-fight-ebola-financial-contributions-still-urgently-needed Successful "Poultry Project" Puts Egg on Illinois Pastor's Face <p><em>The following is a letter from Rev. Dr. Stephen G. Willis:</em></p><p>Dear IM staff,</p><p>Enclosed with this letter please find a check from the children of First Baptist Church Newton, IL to establish an egg hatchery and hen layer operation via the IM Poultry for Protein and Profit in South Africa project under the direction of Drs. Anita and Rick Gutierrez. </p><p>During the summer months, the children of the church bring in offerings of change and place them in a recepticle as they come forward for the Children's Sermon. The offerings are then used to fund a particular mission project. This year, this project was chosen and the children far exceeded the goal of $1,500. </p><p>The receptacle used for the collections was a chicken watering can. A chicken cage graced the front of the church. Periodic updates using an "egg" graph were given. Each child received a red t-shirt emblazoned with a "Poultry for Protein and Profit in South Africa" graphic. As an incentive, I agreed to take a pie to the face if the goal was met. Instead, on the final day with the goal exceeded, I was treated to an "eggseptional" event with three raw eggs being broken over my head. In addition, a picnic was enjoyed by the entire church with an egg toss and an egg hunt being part of the activities. </p><p>The children of the church have conducted these annual offerings for five years now. This was the largest offering they have received to date. Our church is proud of their efforts, and very happy to present this check for the purpose of assisting a family in South Africa.</p><p>Your in Him,</p><p>Stephen G. Willis</p> Mon, 13 Oct 2014 06:53:52 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/55977-successful-poultry-project-puts-egg-on-illinois-pastor-s-face https://internationalministries.org/read/55977-successful-poultry-project-puts-egg-on-illinois-pastor-s-face Go With the Flow! <p class="MsoNormal">“Airway, Breathing, Circulation” - thus begins the mantra that doctors use to aid people who are experiencing a life threatening event.&nbsp; &nbsp;The first two address how air is entering and leaving the body. Looking at circulation, we are concerned about how blood flows to bring nutrients and air and take wastes from the whole body.<o:p></o:p></p><p class="MsoNormal">Both blood pressure and flow direction are important. Did you know that in the healthy arteries of your legs, the blood flows backwards briefly while the heart relaxes and refills? I didn’t until I started doing ultrasound. Using a portable Doppler flow device allows us to screen for abnormal flow direction and amount of flow while the heart is beating. We also are comparing the blood pressures of the arms and legs. This is called the ankle brachial index (ABI). Together these methods are a powerful early warning system for vessel disease. <o:p></o:p></p><p class="MsoNormal">In our setting many people have undiagnosed vessel disease. We recently found a woman with a severe blockage of blood flow to her arm using this method, even though she was only fifty. Her pressure in the left arm was only 57% of her right arm, and the flow was abnormal and weak. She will receive further evaluation and treatment. In India, researchers found that this was a good screening test for people who also had heart disease. If they get a concerning result on this test, they had an over 90% chance of having blockages to one or more heart vessels, which could lead to a heart attack. We have also found this to be true here in South Africa with our local people whose ancestors came from India.<o:p></o:p></p><p class="MsoNormal">After seeing how useful and simple it is to use this non-invasive screening test, we just purchased another unit for health builder use. Now we will be able to have two units operating side by side in our field screening settings. This will enhance service. We envision a nurse or doctor running one unit and an assistant running another unit nearby. If there are abnormal results with the assistant, they will be confirmed. Eventually the assistant will be able to operate more independently. With a diabetes rate of over 25% in 50 year old people here, this test picks up a lot of disease. The people are then encouraged to better care for their arteries, and they are encouraged to have their heart arteries looked into as well. &nbsp;&nbsp;Our health builders can work with people over the long-term to help them develop healthy eating and exercise habits.<o:p></o:p></p><p class="MsoNormal"> </p><p class="MsoNormal">Thank you for supporting our efforts to provide intelligent service to people who need further attention and encouragement.&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></p> Thu, 04 Sep 2014 07:56:34 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/55375-go-with-the-flow- https://internationalministries.org/read/55375-go-with-the-flow- Climbing on the Wagon <p class="MsoNormal"><span class="apple-converted-space"><span style="font-size: 10.5pt;line-height:115%;font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#252525; background:white">James 5:16 </span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt; line-height:115%;font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#001320;background: #FDFEFF">Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10.5pt;line-height:115%;font-family: &quot;Arial&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#001320;background:#FDFEFF">It is grey, drizzling and cold- the wind is coming up. I stand on a wet, wobbly junk aluminum chair alongside a rusting, corrugated-zinc and timber shack.&nbsp; I am putting up a wire to provide supplemental lighting for Zandile’s hens who spend their nights in an abandoned travel trailer nearby. The day is now 11 hours long; these hens need 14 to 16 hours lightning to lay most effectively. As I oscillate back and forth on wet unsteady feet trying to tie a knot in the wire to the beam above my head, I wonder if I will break this chair, a valuable item to this poor family, or just fall down and get hurt. Thankfully, neither happens. I set up the new incubator with Zandile that I have brought for her.&nbsp; <o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10.5pt;line-height:115%;font-family: &quot;Arial&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#001320;background:#FDFEFF">Later we sit inside and Zandile’s Discovering God Together group gathers for their weekly meeting. In attendance are eight including her cousin Siya. I remember first meeting Siya about three months ago. Siya was setting out clean water for the chickens, and she smelled of alcohol. One of the first questions a Discovery group asks every week is:&nbsp; “What are some of the needs you or people in your community have?” In front of eight of her close neighbors, Siya says: “I need to stop drinking.” God has entered the room.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10.5pt;line-height:115%;font-family: &quot;Arial&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#001320;background:#FDFEFF">Siya has HIV and tuberculosis. She almost died a few months ago. She has been drinking for years. A horrible taxi accident three years ago left her with steel plates and rods in her hip, arm and without much use in her left hand. Currently she drinks about four liters (a gallon) a day of the beer Carling Black Label, 5.5 percent alcohol by volume.&nbsp; This is a total of about eight drinks per day by American equivalence standards. <o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10.5pt;line-height:115%;font-family: &quot;Arial&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#001320;background:#FDFEFF">The Scripture is the story of Noah in Genesis 6:5-8, where God’s disappointment with man is described, and his drastic plan to make a new start. These verses make us reflect on our sins. I think about my own problems with impatience when confronted with people not coming through. Siya’s honesty about her drinking is inspirational. The group makes a plan with Siya, to help her meet her goals. She will cut back to three liters per day week one, two liters week two, one liter week three, ½ liter per day week four, and completely stop drinking by week five. They will talk to the woman who owns the local tavern to limit her access to Carling Black Label, as well as take Siya’s money to buy the things she needs for her house so she doesn’t have excess free cash.&nbsp; Siya will not go to town, where she always ends up drinking. This is a rural setting. We pray with Siya and she is crying.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10.5pt;line-height:115%;font-family: &quot;Arial&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#001320;background:#FDFEFF">Siya is a woman who really wants to change, and she has confessed this in front of her neighbors. This is the boldness of the Holy Spirit. How many of us are this brave? I am inspired to lose about 15 pounds, similar to Siya’s plan to cut back on her drinking. Her neighbors will help her keep it real. They understand all the stresses that Siya faces. What liberation it is to confess our needs in front of the Living God and our neighbors. Please say a prayer for Siya if you are reading this.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p> </p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10.5pt;line-height:115%;font-family: &quot;Arial&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#001320;background:#FDFEFF">Yours in Christ,<br> Rick Gutierrez </span><span style="font-size:10.5pt;line-height:115%; font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#252525;background:white">&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p> Tue, 29 Apr 2014 01:43:46 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/53753-climbing-on-the-wagon https://internationalministries.org/read/53753-climbing-on-the-wagon Come, Grow, Change in Inanda <p> </p><p class="MsoBodyText" style="margin: 0in 0in 6pt; tab-stops: right 423.0pt;"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Comic Sans MS&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">Jabulile is a young Zulu mother who cleans houses to earn a living for herself and her daughter. We met Jabulile this past year as we started training people to serve in an area of Durban where there is a high degree of homelessness. A church in this setting ministers to homeless people and women who are struggling with survival in the city. Jabulile volunteered at this church when they host a weekly lunch for homeless women. We started training Jabulile to be a health builder. She was so eager to learn that in a few months she was done and had joined us and four other medical students from the Nelson Mandala School of Medicine in training the others at the church in Durban! After a few more months, Jabulile started to do health screening, education and referral for HIV, high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity in her own area called Inanda, about ½ hour away from the center of Durban.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>Life expectancy in South Africa overall is 49.5 years but in Inanda it is certainly lower.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>This is largely due to the relatively higher rates of HIV in this growing peri-urban slum filled with people hoping for a better life in Durban than they have found elsewhere. We were with Jabulile last Saturday morning when we set up health stations at a local school which was ½ burned down. Even though it was a cold and rainy morning we had 15 people an hour coming by and receiving health screening from supplies provided through White Cross. A man who played guitar told us he would come back and play for us. As his elderly father received screening, he started singing and playing for us! What a blessing. On the way out, four medical students and I had tea at Jabulile’s home. We visited with her twenty young chickens that we provided to her that were being brooded in a side room. Jabulile is training 2 others in her community as health builders. We see the whole picture of God’s grace being carried out in Jabulile’s life. We are proud to be able to equip and train Jabulile, as well as provide her the business and nutritional opportunity with poultry production.</span></b></p><p class="MsoBodyText" style="margin: 0in 0in 6pt; tab-stops: right 423.0pt;"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Comic Sans MS&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">Blessings,</span></b></p><p class="MsoBodyText" style="margin: 0in 0in 6pt; tab-stops: right 423.0pt;"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Comic Sans MS&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">Rick Gutierrez</span></b></p><p> </p> Mon, 30 Sep 2013 07:56:39 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/50559-come-grow-change-in-inanda https://internationalministries.org/read/50559-come-grow-change-in-inanda Health Building Ten Years On <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:OfficeDocumentSettings> <o:AllowPNG/> </o:OfficeDocumentSettings> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:OfficeDocumentSettings> <o:AllowPNG/> </o:OfficeDocumentSettings> </xml><![endif]--> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">For a decade, we have taken leadership where HIV-the virus that causes AIDS, is very common. We have trained local people to stand up to the diseases which were killing their families and friends. Our Health Builders have been out there, encouraging people living with HIV and AIDS along with other common conditions, while offering them on the spot testing, referrals, understanding and prayers. We do this in homes, or create privacy in public spaces to offer this service. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">This was a creative venture ten years ago, when nobody else was doing this. We are still the only group in KwaZulu-Natal which is offering broad preventive health training to lay people on location at the point of need. We do this concurrently in five to ten different locations at a time. We do it over months and years. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">We were the first to create animations in English and Zulu about HIV testing, treatment and what the disease was like. Nobody was doing this, despite HIV being present in a quarter to a third of people in some areas. When you are the only ones doing something, you eventually have to ask “Where is everybody else?”</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">We understand that we see differently because we had unique backgrounds in medicine, immunology research and taking health efforts out to people like migrant farm workers in West Michigan. This made us see possibilities where other people didn’t. Critically, we enjoy the ongoing prayers and support of donors over years. Together we are building capacity and long-term solutions to problems which won’t go away. This is mercy in action, built on the skills, work and resources of those who know and love God. As long as there are resourceful people who believe these things, we will be able to continue.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">The strategy of testing and treating early has recent support from French national AIDS researcher L. Hocqueloux who tested the response after four years of treatment for HIV. He found that those with high CD4 counts at the beginning of treatment were fifteen (15) times as likely to have a normal CD4 count, CD4:CD8 ratio and low HIV levels in their blood than people who started treatment with a low CD4 count. This means that our training people who can test in the villages are finding people who are more likely to end up with an intact immune system after some years of treatment. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">Now that we have paved the way, people are joining us on this journey. Recently representatives of the Health Department and Government invited us to train Traditional Healers in our methods of Health Building. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">We thank you again for your enduring support of this work of mercy. We pray you will find blessing in it, as much as we have found blessing in our service.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">Rick Gutierrez</span></p> <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark/> <w:EnableOpenTypeKerning/> <w:DontFlipMirrorIndents/> <w:OverrideTableStyleHps/> </w:Compatibility> <m:mathPr> <m:mathFont m:val="Cambria Math"/> <m:brkBin m:val="before"/> <m:brkBinSub m:val="&#45;-"/> <m:smallFrac m:val="off"/> <m:dispDef/> <m:lMargin m:val="0"/> <m:rMargin m:val="0"/> <m:defJc m:val="centerGroup"/> <m:wrapIndent m:val="1440"/> <m:intLim m:val="subSup"/> <m:naryLim m:val="undOvr"/> </m:mathPr></w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" DefUnhideWhenUsed="true" DefSemiHidden="true" DefQFormat="false" DefPriority="99" LatentStyleCount="267"> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="0" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Normal"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="heading 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="35" QFormat="true" Name="caption"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="10" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" Name="Default Paragraph Font"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="11" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtitle"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="22" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Strong"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="20" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="59" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Table Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Placeholder Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="No Spacing"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Revision"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="34" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="List Paragraph"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="29" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="30" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="19" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="21" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="31" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="32" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="33" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Book Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="37" Name="Bibliography"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" QFormat="true" Name="TOC Heading"/> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";} </style> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark/> <w:EnableOpenTypeKerning/> <w:DontFlipMirrorIndents/> <w:OverrideTableStyleHps/> </w:Compatibility> <m:mathPr> <m:mathFont m:val="Cambria Math"/> <m:brkBin m:val="before"/> <m:brkBinSub m:val="&#45;-"/> <m:smallFrac m:val="off"/> <m:dispDef/> <m:lMargin m:val="0"/> <m:rMargin m:val="0"/> <m:defJc m:val="centerGroup"/> <m:wrapIndent m:val="1440"/> <m:intLim m:val="subSup"/> <m:naryLim m:val="undOvr"/> </m:mathPr></w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" DefUnhideWhenUsed="true" DefSemiHidden="true" DefQFormat="false" DefPriority="99" LatentStyleCount="267"> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="0" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Normal"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="heading 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="35" QFormat="true" Name="caption"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="10" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" Name="Default Paragraph Font"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="11" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtitle"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="22" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Strong"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="20" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="59" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Table Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Placeholder Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="No Spacing"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Revision"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="34" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="List Paragraph"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="29" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="30" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="19" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="21" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="31" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="32" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="33" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Book Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="37" Name="Bibliography"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" QFormat="true" Name="TOC Heading"/> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";} </style> <![endif]--><o:p></o:p> Tue, 20 Aug 2013 00:04:15 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/49944-health-building-ten-years-on https://internationalministries.org/read/49944-health-building-ten-years-on HIV AIDS Consumption Comeback <p></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-ligatures:none">Advanced Workshop for AIDS Clinical Care (AWACC) is an annual conference held in Durban, South Africa.&nbsp;&nbsp; This year our HIV animation series in English and Zulu was announced as a hand out for the doctors and nurses who attended the conference. Many serving in rural South African clinics and hospitals were in attendance, and all our videos were snatched up. We have about 20,000 YouTube hits on the three animations to date.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-ligatures:none">Tuberculosis was a big highlight of the conference, as well as obesity and arterial disease among people living with HIV and AIDS.&nbsp; We are all over the obesity and arterial disease problem with our health builders, but we need to step up and do more about tuberculosis.&nbsp; The major way of transmission of the really bad forms called MDR (multi-drug resistant) and XDR (extremely drug resistant) is from sitting in waiting rooms at clinics or riding in crowded taxis called combis where somebody with tuberculosis is coughing.&nbsp; It only takes breathing in about 10 aerosolized TB bugs to get the disease.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-ligatures:none">Dr. Jacques Grosset from France said in the early 1960s he predicted the current problems with resistant forms of tuberculosis.&nbsp; Six years ago 52/53 patients died in one Tugela Ferry hospital north of us from XXDR-TB.&nbsp; At the time, there had only been 347 cases in the world.&nbsp; Dr. Grosset recommended that the focus on TB treatment be getting the people with simple TB identified and treated before they got the advanced and drug resistant forms.&nbsp; Testing and treating for HIV is also vital as reduced immune function predisposes to TB. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; <br></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-bidi-font-family:Tahoma">One in four young adults in South Africa is infected with HIV, and of these, up to two thirds may also be infected with TB. &nbsp;People with HIV also have a much higher risk of TB infection rapidly turning into active disease.&nbsp; A person infected with TB but without HIV infection usually has only a 5 – 10% risk of developing active TB throughout his lifetime.&nbsp; However, if a person is also HIV-infected, the risk of developing active TB after TB infection increases to 5 – 10% <b>per year</b>. (<a href="http://www.mrc.ac.za/public/fact7.htm">http://www.mrc.ac.za/public/fact7.htm</a>)<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-ligatures:none">Here is a summary of a series of emails we received from a health educator who is using our video in the Tugela Ferry area:<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-top:6.0pt;margin-right:.8in;margin-bottom: 8.0pt;margin-left:.8in;mso-pagination:none"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-bidi-font-family:Tahoma">“I am working on a treatment literacy program for HIV/TB co-infected patients that are being cared for in a hospital step down unit here. I have not managed to master isiZulu and most of the patients here do not understand English and many are illiterate so audio-visuals seem like a promising way to go…<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-top:6.0pt;margin-right:.8in;margin-bottom: 8.0pt;margin-left:.8in;mso-pagination:none"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-bidi-font-family:Tahoma">I want to send you an update to tell you that we have been using the (HIV) DVD's constantly.&nbsp; I shared one copy with a health clinic and the other we have shown to at least 50 high school students that we have been working with as well as another random 2 dozen or more showings... <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-top:6.0pt;margin-right:.8in;margin-bottom: 8.0pt;margin-left:.8in;mso-pagination:none"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-bidi-font-family:Tahoma">A Tribal Council watched the video during a 3 day training another colleague and I did this week...<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-top:6.0pt;margin-right:.8in;margin-bottom: 8.0pt;margin-left:.8in;mso-pagination:none"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-bidi-font-family:Tahoma">The weekend of November 23, I will be gathering with ~25 other colleagues in KwaZulu-Natal.&nbsp; We like to share what is working in&nbsp;our communities.&nbsp; I will show these DVDs... <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-top:6.0pt;margin-right:.8in;margin-bottom: 8.0pt;margin-left:.8in;mso-pagination:none"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-bidi-font-family:Tahoma">Will other topics be done like this?”</span><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-ligatures:none"><o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-ligatures:none">We would like to tackle tuberculosis as an animation project as it is vital that people are widely educated on TB. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;mso-ligatures:none">On this Thanksgiving, we are especially grateful for your support that enables us to equip many others in the fight against these two diseases – one ancient and one modern - which are teamed up in a deadly combo.&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p><p></p> Wed, 21 Nov 2012 10:37:41 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/45603-hiv-aids-consumption-comeback https://internationalministries.org/read/45603-hiv-aids-consumption-comeback Bring Blessing to People in Need This Year Through IM’s Global Gifts Program. <p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--></p><p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" LatentStyleCount="156"> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if !mso]><object classid="clsid:38481807-CA0E-42D2-BF39-B33AF135CC4D" id=ieooui></object> <style> st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } </style> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} </style> <![endif]--> </p><p><span style="font-family:&quot;Gill Sans MT&quot;">Individuals and families who want to help a child or family in need this Christmas can purchase a Global Gift from American Baptist International Ministries (IM) 2012 Global Gift wish list.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:&quot;Gill Sans MT&quot;">This year’s wish list includes meaningful gifts that would bring a smile to the face of many on a Christmas shopping list, including nieces, nephews, coaches, Sunday school teachers, librarians, favorite aunts and uncles, hairdressers, and so many others. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family:&quot;Gill Sans MT&quot;">Each gift is fun to give and very much needed somewhere in the world.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>Gift-givers may choose from among 20 different items, including: a pig for a child in Haiti ($60)… personal hygiene kits for maids imprisoned in Lebanon (three for $90)… four books for a classroom in Japan ($100)… hot lunches for one preschooler for a year in Thailand ($160). A family or group may even want to chip in to sponsor a worthy student for a year in a seminary in Costa Rica ($4,210). <span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp;</span>What a wonderful way to demonstrate Christ’s desire to give and to receive love!</span></p> <p><span style="font-family:&quot;Gill Sans MT&quot;">Gifts are available starting at $28. The complete wish list can be found at on the <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/drives/8">Global Gifts page</a>. <span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp;</span>Each gift has been selected by a missionary or partner because they know the deepest needs and desires of the people they serve.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>The Global Gift program also invites gifts for individual IM missionaries, or to help those who are in greatest need as determined by IM.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family:&quot;Gill Sans MT&quot;">This year gift-givers can <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/uploads/document/asset/45319/2012thankyoucertificate.pdf">download</a> a Global Gifts Bring Blessing Certificate to present to the recipient informing them of the gift purchased in their honor. Gift choices must be made by December 31, 2012.</span></p><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Gill Sans MT&quot;">For more information, contact Catherine Nold: <a href="mailto:Catherine.nold@abc-usa.org">Catherine.nold@abc-usa.org</a>.</span></i> <p><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt; font-family:&quot;Gill Sans MT&quot;">Find IM on Facebook: International Ministries – American Baptist</span></i></p> <p></p> Wed, 07 Nov 2012 12:07:37 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/45425-bring-blessing-to-people-in-need-this-year-through-im-s-global-gifts-program- https://internationalministries.org/read/45425-bring-blessing-to-people-in-need-this-year-through-im-s-global-gifts-program- The Eyes of All <p> <span style="font-family: &quot;Century Schoolbook&quot;; font-style: italic; language: en-ZA; mso-ansi-language: en-ZA; mso-ligatures: none;" lang="en-ZA">The eyes of all wait upon thee; and thou givest them their meat in due season. Thou openest thine hand, and satisfiest the desire of every living thing. Psalm 145:15-16<!--?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /--><o:p></o:p></span></p><p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 11pt; language: en-ZA; mso-ansi-language: en-ZA; mso-ligatures: none; mso-default-font-family: Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family: Calibri; mso-latin-font-family: Calibri; mso-greek-font-family: Calibri; mso-cyrillic-font-family: Calibri; mso-armenian-font-family: Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family: Calibri; mso-arabic-font-family: Calibri; mso-thai-font-family: Calibri; mso-currency-font-family: Calibri; mso-latinext-font-family: Calibri;" lang="en-ZA">There is a happy din and the warmth of the brooder hits my face as I carefully pull the velcro door flaps open. Inside 220 eyes swivel and peer into mine. I have come to bring water and food to my growing young cockerels and pullets. This is a twice-daily ritual of satisfying the desires of rapidly developing birds, which in turn will mature to satisfy the desires of African families in need of wholesome protein for their fragile lives. <o:p></o:p></span></p><p> <span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 11pt; language: en-ZA; mso-ansi-language: en-ZA; mso-ligatures: none; mso-default-font-family: Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family: Calibri; mso-latin-font-family: Calibri; mso-greek-font-family: Calibri; mso-cyrillic-font-family: Calibri; mso-armenian-font-family: Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family: Calibri; mso-arabic-font-family: Calibri; mso-thai-font-family: Calibri; mso-currency-font-family: Calibri; mso-latinext-font-family: Calibri;" lang="en-ZA">This cycle of feeding, watering, cleaning and changing things inside the brooder, of keeping the temperature within a two degree range around the clock makes one pensive about our God, who satisfies the desire of every living thing. <o:p></o:p></span></p><p> <span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 11pt; language: en-ZA; mso-ansi-language: en-ZA; mso-ligatures: none; mso-default-font-family: Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family: Calibri; mso-latin-font-family: Calibri; mso-greek-font-family: Calibri; mso-cyrillic-font-family: Calibri; mso-armenian-font-family: Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family: Calibri; mso-arabic-font-family: Calibri; mso-thai-font-family: Calibri; mso-currency-font-family: Calibri; mso-latinext-font-family: Calibri;" lang="en-ZA">Watching, listening and feeling the pecking on the brooder walls transmitted up through the concrete block below, I am one with my birds. I know their moods by their chorus, I have been with them from first in the morning and checked them the last thing before bed. I reflect on how good our God is, who loves and cares even for these little birds. He clothes them with an elegant stripped Zebra-banded pattern of plumage that makes them comically dapper. He has endowed them with disease resistance, given them speed, agility, antigravity jumping skills. He has made them desirable both for meat and for eggs, especially the latter. As they grow to full maturity, they will complete the cycle which continues that great riddle: What comes first.....the chicken or the egg?<o:p></o:p></span></p><p> <span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 11pt; language: en-ZA; mso-ansi-language: en-ZA; mso-ligatures: none; mso-default-font-family: Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family: Calibri; mso-latin-font-family: Calibri; mso-greek-font-family: Calibri; mso-cyrillic-font-family: Calibri; mso-armenian-font-family: Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family: Calibri; mso-arabic-font-family: Calibri; mso-thai-font-family: Calibri; mso-currency-font-family: Calibri; mso-latinext-font-family: Calibri;" lang="en-ZA">Carrying 110 pound bags of feed to my ratproof<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>bunker with my middle aged frame, it is all just possible. I have looked to God, and he has satisfied my desires for 46 years. These new creatures are part of the same plan, they also ultimately look to him, and he never disappoints. <o:p></o:p></span></p><p> <span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 11pt; language: en-ZA; mso-ansi-language: en-ZA; mso-ligatures: none; mso-default-font-family: Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family: Calibri; mso-latin-font-family: Calibri; mso-greek-font-family: Calibri; mso-cyrillic-font-family: Calibri; mso-armenian-font-family: Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family: Calibri; mso-arabic-font-family: Calibri; mso-thai-font-family: Calibri; mso-currency-font-family: Calibri; mso-latinext-font-family: Calibri;" lang="en-ZA">Spending time with<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>a legion of gregarious juvenile fowls is very comforting. Looking through the brooder<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>vent screen window from a seat outside is what I call “chick TV” It is somewhat addictive after a long day. If the phone rings, they know where to find me.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p> <span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 11pt; language: en-ZA; mso-ansi-language: en-ZA; mso-ligatures: none; mso-default-font-family: Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family: Calibri; mso-latin-font-family: Calibri; mso-greek-font-family: Calibri; mso-cyrillic-font-family: Calibri; mso-armenian-font-family: Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family: Calibri; mso-arabic-font-family: Calibri; mso-thai-font-family: Calibri; mso-currency-font-family: Calibri; mso-latinext-font-family: Calibri;" lang="en-ZA">The great American drought of this summer has pushed up corn prices here in Africa and surprised grain mill operators with the linkage and power of the global market. I spoke with a mill owner yesterday trying to price quality feeds for budget birds, and got the story. I am grateful to be able to heft 110 pound bags of grain for these birds, and that water is available for them to drink and grow on here in Africa where spring is at hand. As Joseph satisfied his brothers and father with grains from Egypt to meet their needs, today his spiritual descendants are providing their African brothers with the means to eat and live. The eyes of all wait upon thee.......... and God has opened his hand and satisfied the desires of every living thing!<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span></span></p><p><em><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 11pt; language: en-ZA; mso-ansi-language: en-ZA; mso-ligatures: none; mso-default-font-family: Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family: Calibri; mso-latin-font-family: Calibri; mso-greek-font-family: Calibri; mso-cyrillic-font-family: Calibri; mso-armenian-font-family: Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family: Calibri; mso-arabic-font-family: Calibri; mso-thai-font-family: Calibri; mso-currency-font-family: Calibri; mso-latinext-font-family: Calibri;" lang="en-ZA"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">To donate towards the chicken project go t</span></span><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 11pt; language: en-ZA; mso-ansi-language: en-ZA; mso-ligatures: none; mso-default-font-family: Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family: Calibri; mso-latin-font-family: Calibri; mso-greek-font-family: Calibri; mso-cyrillic-font-family: Calibri; mso-armenian-font-family: Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family: Calibri; mso-arabic-font-family: Calibri; mso-thai-font-family: Calibri; mso-currency-font-family: Calibri; mso-latinext-font-family: Calibri;" lang="en-ZA"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">o:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/projects/55">http://www.internationalministries.org/projects/55</a></span></span></em></p><p style="text-indent: -18pt; margin-bottom: 10pt; margin-left: 18pt; mso-pagination: widow-orphan; mso-level-number-format: bullet; mso-level-text: ·; mso-level-size: 10.0pt; mso-level-font-family: Symbol;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="line-height: 114%; font-family: Calibri; font-size: 11pt; language: en-ZA; mso-ansi-language: en-ZA; mso-ligatures: none; mso-default-font-family: Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family: Calibri; mso-latin-font-family: Calibri; mso-greek-font-family: Calibri; mso-cyrillic-font-family: Calibri; mso-armenian-font-family: Calibri; mso-hebrew-font-family: Calibri; mso-arabic-font-family: Calibri; mso-thai-font-family: Calibri; mso-currency-font-family: Calibri; mso-latinext-font-family: Calibri;" lang="en-ZA"><o:p></o:p></span>&nbsp;</p><p> </p><p style="mso-pagination: none;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="language: en-US; mso-ligatures: none;" lang="en-US">&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p><p> </p> Thu, 06 Sep 2012 14:01:40 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/44547-the-eyes-of-all https://internationalministries.org/read/44547-the-eyes-of-all Hensome Profits <p> <font face="Calibri">Jesus said in Matthew 23:37 that he longed to gather the people of Jerusalem together as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings. Jesus would've known chickens even from his boyhood in Egypt, where they came from Persia about 1000 BC. Chickens now outnumber humans by four to one. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>They are an extremely valuable gift of God, 28 billion chickens can't be wrong!</font></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><font face="Calibri">In Zululand, a high carb low nutrient density protein poor diet is common. This is even more concerning in HIV infected people and orphan households. Healthy hens laying 300 eggs a year, each egg providing 13% of daily protein needs, all nine essential amino acids, and 13 essential vitamins and minerals including vitamin D, choline and selenium, are hard to beat, no yolk!<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p></font></p><p> <font face="Calibri">We began to plan how to provide chickens to our health builders as a result of a survey of gardening skills and poultry that we did last July.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>We consulted with a local missionary, farmer and inventor named Chris who works with Izulu Orphan Projects.&nbsp; He&nbsp;began to experiment with cost-effective ways to equip people to raise chickens.<o:p></o:p></font></p><p> <font face="Calibri">In America, we take good fences for granted. Not so in Africa. Here unfenced animals make havoc in gardens and fields. Chickens are also destructive if allowed to wander unrestrained. We concluded that the best solution for our area is the chicken tractor, a closed-topped open-bottomed portable chicken coop on wheels. Chris initially constructed them out of wood and chicken wire but it was heavy to move and the chicken wire is tempting to theives.&nbsp; Chris changed the design to use plastic pipe and plastic netting instead.&nbsp; </font><font face="Calibri">The tractors are shaded with Tyvek bags cut to size and obtained free from a local paper factory. The tractor is moved every couple of days to new ground so that the chickens within can work the land. Contained yet mobile chickens are the solution to many interrelated problems in Africa and elsewhere. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>Land fertility? Fresh chicken droppings have 2 to 3 times the nitrogen 3 to 5 times the phosphorus versus other animal droppings. Chickens scratch and kick, mixing this richness into the topsoil layer. Bugs and weeds? <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>These become highly nutritious<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>chicken feed.<o:p></o:p></font></p><p> <font face="Calibri">Last fall we announced our poultry for protein and profit initiative. Forty people and churches from 21 states supported this project in its first two months! That's some widespread fowl appeal. From Clovis, California to Castro, New York…. Christ followers were plumping for healthy hens in Zululand and beyond.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>This enabled us to move forward with the project.<o:p></o:p></font></p><p> <font face="Calibri">Chris’s farm is next door to Jabulani Rehabilitation Centre which has an existing workshop and residents eager for work.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>Titus was bit by a venomous snake at age 15, subsequently losing his leg. Now in his 30s, like Bezalel he is skilled in many crafts. A couple of weeks ago, we teamed up with Chris to train Titus to lead a team of 12 disabled people at Jabulani Home to build the first chicken tractors for our health builders. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>Our chicken tractor project is the subject of a Zululand Observer newspaper article this week. Local people are being invited to sponsor a chicken tractor for an orphan household. Chris will manage the process in conjunction with us. Our hope is that hundreds of tractors will be sponsored in the coming year. This will generate an excellent income for the residents of Jabulani, while bringing good nutrition and income generation to hundreds of Izulu Orphan Project families. Our Health Builder initiative is stimulating a local charity multiplier effect. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span><o:p></o:p></font></p><p> <font face="Calibri">Our first 10 chicken tractors were constructed, and we began delivery to health builders in February. Each health builder is expected to create a fenced area for growing corn, sunflower, sorghum and Chaya. The crops grown will be used for family needs as well as ground for chicken feed. Fencing can be made up of plants like cactus, spiny acacia branches, etc. When health builders demonstrate this commitment, they receive two chicken tractors ($100 each), four hens &amp; two roosters, ($50 for chickens), a small grinder for feed and three large composting bags. I estimate a return on investment of almost twofold in eggs alone in the first year. Our PVC pipe- framed chicken tractors should last for at least five to ten years, and are easy to repair. We are purchasing roosters and hens with robust genetics from local village breeders.<o:p></o:p></font></p><p> <font face="Calibri">We have just completed a video on an easy to grow green vegetable called Chaya which can be used as chicken feed.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>We will produce videos on other skills such as assembling a chicken tractor from a kit, poultry disease control, protection of chicks, growing chicken feed and marketing.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span><o:p></o:p></font></p><p> <font face="Calibri">We thank our first 40 investors for supporting this vital project. We intend to make chicken tractor kits with pre-sewn Tyvek shading for ease of distribution, with a DVD showing assembly and written instructions as well. In the end, we hope to see chicken tractors improving our African soils, enriching the lives of the people Jesus calls us to serve together.<o:p></o:p></font></p><p> <font face="Calibri">To eggs for Easter, and poultry power, Rick Gutierrez<o:p></o:p></font></p><p> <font face="Calibri"><em>To find out how to donate towards chickens, chicken tractors and video production costs, go to: <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/projects/55">http://www.internationalministries.org/projects/55</a><o:p></o:p></em></font></p><p> </p> Fri, 09 Mar 2012 05:15:24 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/42079-hensome-profits https://internationalministries.org/read/42079-hensome-profits Health Builder Graduation in Zululand We formally graduated 29 health builders in September. The graduation took place as part of the worship at the church associated with Izulu Orphan Project. Five graduated in blood pressure and are employed by the government funded Community Works Program (CWP)which is administered by the Izulu Orphan Project. Twenty-four women met the course requirements for blood pressure, blood sugar and HIV screening and education and are also employed by the CWP. We were told that none of them have ever had any ceremony marking any graduation so this event had special significance to them. Four hundred people came to witness this special event. Fri, 21 Oct 2011 07:34:12 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/39821-health-builder-graduation-in-zululand https://internationalministries.org/read/39821-health-builder-graduation-in-zululand Poultry for Protein and Profit <span style="FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">We have been mulling over just what inputs would most<span>&nbsp; </span>improve the food production and income generation of our health builders.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>In June, a nutritionist did a survey of the rural area served by the health builders of the iZulu Orphan Project in Zululand.<span>&nbsp; </span>One of her conclusions was that the people are lacking high quality protein and that eggs would be the best source.</span><span style="FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;"><br><br>We have seen a large variety in the gardening skills of health builders,<span>&nbsp; </span>the state of their gardens, fencing, and poultry rearing. In all gardens, there was a lack of good fencing, and evidence of significant damage to vegetable crops from poultry, goats or cattle.<br><br>On one extreme, the family of a health builder named Sandile has sold about 200 chickens in the last year.&nbsp; Each one sells for about $6.70 for a live adult chicken.&nbsp; In her household, there are 7 people - 2 adults and 5 children.&nbsp; The chickens produce 15-20 eggs per week, which the family consumes.&nbsp; They have a chicken coop as well as a rearing pen where there were 30 chicks with a heat lamp.&nbsp; The family purchases chicks and commercial crumble feed for them.&nbsp; Twenty-two pounds of this feed costs about as much as a live, fully grown chicken.&nbsp; <br><br>On the other extreme, were a few health builders that had no gardens or animals at all.&nbsp; None of the health builders used mulch.&nbsp; Most had access to water and all have land in this rural area.&nbsp; <br></span><span style="FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;"><br>After seeking the input of health builders and consulting with the director of gardening of the Community Works Project in the area, we have formulated a plan.&nbsp;&nbsp; In a step-wise fashion, we will introduce sunflowers and corn grown in grass mulch for feed,&nbsp;improve the fencing with chicken-wire, build chicken coops which include nesting areas and finally introduce chickens.&nbsp;&nbsp; </span><span style="FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;"> <p class="style=&quot;mso-pagination:"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;"></span><span style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; DIRECTION: ltr; FONT-FAMILY: Symbol; unicode-bidi: embed;">·</span><span style="WIDTH: 13.5pt;">&nbsp;</span><span style="FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">Please pray for this project which could be used by health builders in rural<span>&nbsp; </span>areas as well as peri-urban informal settlements.</span></p> <p class="style=&quot;mso-pagination:"><span></span>&nbsp;</p></span> Mon, 18 Jul 2011 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/37537-poultry-for-protein-and-profit https://internationalministries.org/read/37537-poultry-for-protein-and-profit New Life <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Khetiwe is a 38 year old woman who was born in rural Zululand, South Africa. At 18, she left her home and went to the nearest big city looking for work.<span>&nbsp; </span>She had one child from a boyfriend who soon left her.<span>&nbsp; </span>She came back to her birthplace and eventually found herself caring for 11 other children from relatives that had either died or left to work in the city. <span>&nbsp;</span><span>&nbsp;</span>She cut reeds and did washing for her neighbors. <span>&nbsp;</span>When she earned enough she would buy cement that she could use to make bricks to build a house.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:"><span></span>Three years ago, Chadd and Kate Bain&nbsp;from Izulu Mission Project found Khetiwe dying of AIDS in a shack that was falling apart.<span>&nbsp; </span>Because 30% of the people in KwaZulu-Natal are HIV positive, Chadd and Kate commonly encounter situations like this one on their outreaches. <span>&nbsp;</span>Many African women have died from AIDS leaving countless orphans.<span>&nbsp; </span>The good news is that Khetiwe’s story ends differently.<span>&nbsp; </span>Chadd and Kate took Khetiwe for treatment and three years later she is still in good health. <span>&nbsp;</span>Khetiwe told me that, “Chadd loved me and shared Jesus.”<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:"><span></span>About a year ago, Chadd and Kate arranged for us to train health builders from this community.<span>&nbsp; </span>Chadd invited Khetiwe to take part.<span>&nbsp; </span>A few days after our first training session with Khetiwe and other trainees from Izulu Orphan Project, Chadd died in a motorcycle accident.<span>&nbsp; </span>Khetiwe has completed her health builder training and is screening her neighbors for high blood pressure, diabetes and HIV.<span>&nbsp; </span>She is referring them to government health clinics and providing health education. <span>&nbsp;</span>Khetiwe is sharing the new life that she has found.</p> Mon, 10 Jan 2011 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/31680-new-life https://internationalministries.org/read/31680-new-life HIV/AIDS in South Africa <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">We went to the “Annual Workshop on Advanced Clinical Care – AIDS” which was held on September 30 and October 1, 2010 in Durban.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Here are some interesting&nbsp;facts that we learned:</p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpFirst"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>The current antiretroviral s (ARVs) available to treat HIV in South Africa are now more effective, better tolerated and less prone to developing resistance than previous ones.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>In South Africa, the CD4 count in adults must be less than 200 to start ARVs except in certain cases where the threshold is less than 350.<span>&nbsp; </span>In the United States, <span>&nbsp;</span>ARVs are started at a CD4 of 500.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>Lower CD4 counts at the onset of ARV treatment are associated with a worse prognosis.<span>&nbsp; </span><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>The average CD4 count at the start of ARV treatment in South Africa is 87.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>The life span after infection with HIV-1 in an untreated person is 9 – 12 <span>&nbsp;</span>years.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>Knowing HIV status, reducing risky sexually behaviours, good nutrition and seeking medical care can increase life span by up to five years.</p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>A person in South Africa on ARVs can expect to live more than 20 years after the time of infection with HIV.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>A non-infected baby on ARV prophylaxis can safely be breastfed by an HIV infected mother.</p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>South Africa has the highest number of people infected with HIV in the world – 5.7 million. </p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>South Africa has the highest number of people on ARVs in the world – 1.2 million.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>Our province of KwaZulu-Natal has the highest number of cases of HIV in South Africa</p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>Treating HIV infected pregnant mothers can reduce the level of transmission to their babies from 30% to almost 0%.</p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>About 40% of pregnant women in the province of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) are infected with HIV.</p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>In KwaZulu-Natal, 30% of women are HIV positive by age 21.<span>&nbsp; </span>This prevalence is reached by age 25 among the men.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>In some rural areas in KZN, HIV tests are positive in 50% of young women.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>The alarmingly high rise in rural women may be due to high rates of co-infection with genital herpes.<span>&nbsp; </span><span>&nbsp;</span>The ulcerated areas of broken skin result in a much higher chance of infection.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>Additionally, during a genital herpes flare- up, an HIV infected person has a transiently higher level of HIV virus which also increases the HIV transmission rate.<span>&nbsp; </span><span>&nbsp;</span>The prevalence of genital herpes infection in people with HIV in South Africa is 90%.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>Male circumcision can reduce HIV in men by 60% during heterosexual encounters.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>TB is the number one cause of death in HIV positive persons.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpLast"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>It is estimated that rapid tests for TB will be available in 2015.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">We can train and equip nurses and lay health builders in the following ways to medically address the above problems:</p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpFirst"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>We can produce educational videos about HIV and TB including prevention and treatment in English, Zulu and other African languages.<span>&nbsp; </span><span>&nbsp;</span>These can be used by health builders and others doing health education.</p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>We can make videos that can be used to train lay people to do rapid HIV tests in their communities. <span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>We can diagnose people as soon as possible by training health builders to screen in churches, homes and at large gatherings of people.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>Even if a newly diagnosed person is ineligible to receive ARVs based on their CD4 count, we can instruct them on lifestyle changes that they can make that can extend their lives up to five years.<span>&nbsp; </span><span>&nbsp;</span>Such changes include good nutrition to boost the immune system and encouraging them to take isoniazide if prescribed to them to prevent TB.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>We can stress the importance for an HIV positive person who is not yet eligible for ARVs to go for a CD4 count every six months at their clinic so that they can start ARVs as soon as they are eligible.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>By doing the above, more parents and caregivers can have those precious additional years to raise their children.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>We can emphasize the importance of testing children so that they can get the benefits of ARV treatment as soon as they are eligible.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Symbol;"><span>·<span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span>Health builders can provide long-term follow-up and encouragement to HIV infected persons.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Through your support of World Mission Offering, we can bring love, healing and hope to the people of South Africa.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Blessings,</p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Rick and Anita Gutierrez</p> Sun, 03 Oct 2010 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/27002-hiv-aids-in-south-africa https://internationalministries.org/read/27002-hiv-aids-in-south-africa uMama <span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: 'Gill Sans MT';">A dozen young chicks zig-zag and chirp behind their mother hen in the dust outside of the rondaval.</span> <p class="style=&quot;mso-pagination:"><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: 'Gill Sans MT';">Inside in the dim, smoky light a slim, ancient Zulu women wearing a patterned blue dress sits with legs extended on a wicker mat. Flies buzz about her as she stares through cataracts from a mask-like face. She is motionless except for a rolling tremor in her right thumb and forefinger. The black smoke from the smouldering log on the floor near her makes our eyes water as we offer our greeting: “Sawubona<span>&nbsp; </span>Mama!”</span></p> <p class="style=&quot;mso-pagination:"><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: 'Gill Sans MT';">Health builder Nomthandazo (“our prayer”) tells us that Mama had a stroke. Together Devi, Kate, Nomthandazo and I spend some time with uMama and find that her blood pressure is 130/80, her sugar is 153, she can move all her parts and her pulses are good. Her ID shows that she was a baby while World War I raged in Europe.</span></p> <p class="style=&quot;mso-pagination:"><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: 'Gill Sans MT';">We help her up as she uses a slender dry sugar cane to take short, barefooted steps down from the grimy concrete floor into the sunny dust amongst the chickens. As the sun illuminates her pearly cataracts, she smiles a toothy smile and calls for her snuff! Not bad for her 93</span><span style="font-size: 7.325pt; font-family: 'Gill Sans MT';">rd</span><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: 'Gill Sans MT';"> trip around the sun.</span></p> <p class="style=&quot;mso-pagination:"><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: 'Gill Sans MT';">This is one of the 1000-odd remote households served by our Zululand partners, where Devi, Anita and I continue to train about 28 people in health building skills. Each day now about a dozen of these are going out to visit about ten households each.</span></p> <p class="style=&quot;mso-pagination:"><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: 'Gill Sans MT';">Yesterday 19 of these trainees joined us for a bible study called “Discovering God together.” We are using this study to make disciples who will tell others, obey the Scripture, and meet practical needs each week. </span></p> <p class="style=&quot;mso-pagination:"><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: 'Gill Sans MT';"></span><span style="font-size: 11pt; line-height: 114%; font-family: 'Gill Sans MT';">Riding over the hillsides in the back of an open-bed Toyota Land Cruiser along with 13 African women, bags of food and health supplies, I praised and thanked God for allowing us to bring His healing and His Word to this people who live in remote, rugged poverty.</span></p> <p class="style=&quot;mso-pagination:"><span></span>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 01 Jun 2010 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/22691-umama https://internationalministries.org/read/22691-umama Footsteps in Africa Today’s missionaries are following in the footsteps of hundreds of American Baptist missionaries with innovative ministries. &nbsp;<br><br>International Ministries and AB Women’s Ministries are co-sponsoring the 2011 Mission Encounter Tour of <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/places/south_africa">South Africa</a> and the <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/places/democratic_republic_of_the_congo">Democratic Republic of Congo</a> from April 21 – May 6. The deadline to join the tour, June 30th, is fast approaching.&nbsp;&nbsp; Don’t miss out on this unique opportunity!<br><br>The Mission Encounter Tour begins in Durban, South Africa with American Baptist medical missionaries, <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/missionaries/66">Drs. Anita and Rick Gutierrez</a>.&nbsp; They will share about their ministry training community healthcare workers and providing basic community health.&nbsp; Anita and Rick are involved in AIDS education and prevention programs.&nbsp; How would your church respond if your community was holding funerals at the rate of 60 per hour?&nbsp; That’s the devastating impact of AIDS in South Africa. &nbsp;<br><br>There are many highlights on this leg of the tour in South Africa, including meeting the women of the Baptist Association of South Africa (BASA) and the Baptist Mission of South Africa (BMSA).&nbsp; You’ll also celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ at a fantastic Easter worship service at the Gutierrez’s church in Durban!&nbsp; And there may even be an opportunity for you to visit and minister to children affected by HIV/AIDS. &nbsp;<br><br>Tour participants will fly north to Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.&nbsp; You’ll visit medical clinics and meet with American Baptist missionaries <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/missionaries/57">Ann and Bill Clemmer</a>, and <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/missionaries/84">Katherine and Wayne Niles</a>.&nbsp; You’ll learn how your White Cross supplies are hard at work relieving suffering and bringing hope. <br><br>How different would your life be if you couldn’t read?&nbsp; Missionary <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/missionaries/85">Miriam Noyes</a> is the technical advisor for the Congolese Baptist organization, “Literacy for Family Well-Being”.&nbsp; She will share how this program is spreading throughout Congo.&nbsp; This program improves the health, welfare and educational success of entire families.&nbsp; Reading creates economic opportunities and combats poverty. &nbsp;<br><br>Talk with missionaries <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/missionaries/75">Jill and Mike Lowery</a> about an alarming new trend on the streets of the capitol city of Kinshasa – young women being trafficked into a life of prostitution.&nbsp; See how these women are being helped when you visit the Mitendi Center.&nbsp; Built with funds raised by AB Women’s Ministries, the Mitendi Center is where the Congolese Baptist women teach sewing, health &amp; hygiene and other job skills that are vital to single mothers and young women coming out of prostitution. &nbsp;<br><br>Tour participants will also worship with local congregations in Kinshasa, sharing their faith and culture. &nbsp;<br><br>The tentative cost for the 2011 Mission Encounter Tour is $4,500.&nbsp; To learn how you can be part of this exciting trip and for more information, please call the AB Women’s Ministries office at 800-222-3872, ext. 2288.<br> Mon, 31 May 2010 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/22680-footsteps-in-africa https://internationalministries.org/read/22680-footsteps-in-africa Heart and Action <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">“I will give them singleness of heart and action so that they will always fear me for their own good and the good of their children after them.” <span style="COLOR: #1f497d;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span>Jeremiah 32:39</p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">&nbsp;</p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Pastor Thuks invited us to do a health screening on a group of men gathered for crime prevention efforts on a Saturday, February 27.<span>&nbsp; </span>His church recently lost its lease of space<span style="COLOR: #1f497d;"> </span>at a local school.<span>&nbsp; </span>Church members bought a used tent and 100 plastic chairs for a total of about $1,100<span style="COLOR: #1f497d;">.<span>&nbsp; </span></span>A local man named D. allowed them to place the tent on his property to hold church gatherings in. <span style="COLOR: #1f497d;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">&nbsp;</p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">D. is a leader of men in the neighborhood branch of a political movement.<span>&nbsp; </span>We were told that some of the former cadres of this movement had subsequently come to Christ and were becoming active in churches. <span>&nbsp;</span>The area men from this movement gathered on this Saturday morning to clear out a nearby area of brush where rapes and murders had recently occurred in this impoverished, crime-ridden area. <span style="COLOR: #1f497d;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span>One of the leaders of the men later told Anita that the men were upset to find the body of a<span style="COLOR: #1f497d;"> </span>newborn<span style="COLOR: #1f497d;"> </span>infant in the brush, which police were called to investigate. </p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">&nbsp;</p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">After the men cleared the brush, they paraded through the neighbourhood.<span>&nbsp; </span>Afterwards, they sang in Zulu and danced with the machetes that they had just used to clear the brush. These men in their 30 and 40s demonstrated their determination to rid the area of crime. <span>&nbsp;</span>About thirty men came to the church tent afterwards to watch our HIV video in Zulu and have screening done for blood pressure, blood sugar and HIV.<span>&nbsp; </span>The men were gracious and appreciative.<span>&nbsp; </span>Many could not easily attend a clinic to be tested during the week because they were working.<span>&nbsp; </span>We found that over half of them were HIV positive. We stressed the importance of following up for care at area government clinics.<span>&nbsp; </span>After being tested,&nbsp;some of them&nbsp;sang songs of the South African struggle era together and&nbsp;drank beer. The church members took their addresses and planned to visit them in their homes in coming weeks.<span>&nbsp; </span>They invited them to join in worship and prayer meetings. </p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">&nbsp;</p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Here is a hard-working, energetic people being destroyed from within by violence and disease and looking for hope, health and security.<span>&nbsp; </span>We felt blessed that we could be here to give these men some information that grants some of them a chance for decades of additional life if they get treatment.<span>&nbsp; </span><span>&nbsp;</span>Please pray that through the church’s ministry these men will find themselves at home in the kingdom of Christ under the Lordship of Jesus. We continue to pray that God raises up men to be leaders and role models for the next generation.<span>&nbsp; </span>Please pray also against the violent attacks which terrorize people and that the efforts to fight crime are blessed. </p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">&nbsp;</p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Yours in Christ,</p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Rick Gutierrez</p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">&nbsp;</p> Sun, 21 Mar 2010 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/19343-heart-and-action https://internationalministries.org/read/19343-heart-and-action Chaya Promotion <span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">Jesus often used agricultural metaphors in his parables. Jesus cares that we are well fed by his Word as well as nutrition. His miracles included feeding thousands with bread and fish. In our health and evangelism efforts, providing a means for people to feed themselves with healthy and easily grown plants has been a long-term interest. Fourteen months ago we planted five cuttings of Chaya (</span><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-STYLE: italic; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">Cnidoscolus chayamansa</span><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">), which were mailed from ECHO (Educational Concerns for Hunger Organization) in North Fort Myers, Florida. Two of the cuttings took, and this last week we potted 32 cuttings from our original Chaya plant. These will be for distribution to our Bethel Health Builders in churches in all our areas of operation. We are also making videos in English and Zulu on the propagation, preparation, and uses of Chaya. </span> <h2><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">Chaya, also called Mayan Spinach or Tree Spinach, grows to about 10 feet tall and 6 feet wide. It has been used since ancient times by the Mayan people of the Yucatan Peninsula, and remains a major green used in cooking there today. This pest, disease, and drought-resistant perennial shrub is easy to grow and will produce food for years. As we promote this highly nutritious plant among our mission partners, we will need to teach people how to grow and use it. For this reason, we are making a video as well as collaborating with a Zulu pastor who is an agricultural student<span>&nbsp; </span>for work amongst the Zulu people. </span></h2> <h2><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">Fresh, healthy greens are often lacking in the diets of poor people, especially those who do not have land or lack basic knowledge in nutrition and gardening skills.<span>&nbsp; </span>Nutritionally, chaya is about twice as excellent as spinach (see table)! Here in Southern Africa, people with HIV/AIDS, heart &amp; artery disease, diabetes and malnutrition could all benefit from this easy to grow plant.<span>&nbsp; </span>Increased self-reliance for both local church missions and those people who adopt this plant could be dually achieved through this initiative. </span></h2> <h2><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">&nbsp;</span><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">Please pray with us that the following goals could be reached by one year from now:</span></h2> <h2><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">&nbsp;</span><span style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; DIRECTION: ltr; FONT-FAMILY: Symbol; unicode-bidi: embed;">·</span><span style="WIDTH: 13.5pt;">&nbsp;</span><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">Chaya plants are safely established will all our mission partners in both rural and urban settings. GPS coordinates of all plants will be recorded and success of our out-planting will be monitored.</span></h2> <h2><span style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; DIRECTION: ltr; FONT-FAMILY: Symbol; unicode-bidi: embed;">·</span><span style="WIDTH: 13.5pt;">&nbsp;</span><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">English and Zulu language videos will be completed, which communicate the knowledge and techniques needed to safely enjoy and promote this life-sustaining Spinach Tree. Video will motivate people to grow and use this plant. </span></h2> <h2><span style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; DIRECTION: ltr; FONT-FAMILY: Symbol; unicode-bidi: embed;">·</span><span style="WIDTH: 13.5pt;">&nbsp;</span><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">Zulu orphan children and caregivers will gain exposure to chaya use and cultivation, and we will establish plantings with at least ten percent of the households we become involved with. </span></h2> <h2><span style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: black; DIRECTION: ltr; FONT-FAMILY: Symbol; unicode-bidi: embed;">·</span><span style="WIDTH: 13.5pt;">&nbsp;</span><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">Our mission partners and Bethel Health Builders will be able to promote this nutritional plant as part of their feeding ministries.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></h2> <h2><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;"><span></span></span><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">Buen Provecho, </span></h2> <h2><span style="FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 11pt; FONT-FAMILY: Calibri;">Rick Gutierrez</span></h2> <p class="style=&quot;mso-pagination:"><span></span>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 20 Jan 2010 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/17641-chaya-promotion https://internationalministries.org/read/17641-chaya-promotion Baptists Join Together in Tornado Relief Effort <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">How often do tornadoes happen in South Africa? <span>&nbsp;</span>There have only been eight previously reported deadly twisters here in the past sixty years. On January 11, 1999, one almost injured President Mandela as he shopped at a pharmacy in Umtata. His bodyguards had him lie down and covered him with their own bodies. Elsewhere in the town the tornado killed eleven people and over 150 were injured. <span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Since August 2008 we have been ministering in Donnybrook in partnership with Phoenix Baptist Church.<span>&nbsp; </span>Together we have been helping Pastor Bongamusa to establish a local church called Donnybrook Baptist Fellowship.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>On November 6, a small but deadly tornado hit this area. Two people died, 66 were injured, and some 200 homes were destroyed. <span>&nbsp;</span>After the disaster, the Wind of the Holy Spirit began blowing through the Body of Christ. Pastor Bongamusa immediately called his friends at the Phoenix Baptist Church, and plans developed to make a day trip out to Donnybrook on Saturday, November 14. <span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>I was part of the team of 24 Baptist short-term missionaries from Phoenix and Tongaat that was organized. <span>&nbsp;</span>Members and friends of the congregation quickly gathered clothing, food and blankets.<span>&nbsp; </span>The cold, misty weather made the 150 mile 10 truck convoy trip take 4 hours.<span>&nbsp; </span>When we arrived, we were sad to see the devastation of homes of people who were already on a marginal level of existence.<span>&nbsp; </span><span>&nbsp;</span>Some people had received tents to stay in, near the remains of their previous homes. <span>&nbsp;</span>A week after the tornado, people were starting to rebuild their homes and shelters despite continued rain and cold.</p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">The presence of Christians bringing practical aid at a time like this lovingly demonstrates that the Wind of the Holy Spirit does trump the rotational destruction of tornadoes. </p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Four of our health builders (Kathy, Savy, Selvie, Pastor Bongamusa) were involved in this outreach. We thank the Lord for the partnership between Baptist churches which allows us to witness together even beyond our local areas. <span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>We will stay engaged in the coming months.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">We made a video, which is being used by Phoenix Baptist Church to inspire members of their congregation to get more involved in mission outreach. If you would like to see the video, it is located at:<span>&nbsp; </span><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3exQRmxxWJw">http://www.<i>youtube</i>.com/watch?v=3exQRmxxWJw</a></p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Yours in Christ,</p> <p class="style=&quot;MARGIN:">Rick Gutierrez</p> Sun, 29 Nov 2009 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/15813-baptists-join-together-in-tornado-relief-effort https://internationalministries.org/read/15813-baptists-join-together-in-tornado-relief-effort Looking Out for the Interests of Others <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">After Thandi’s husband died a few years ago, she was left with three children.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Like so many others, she left her rural home and moved to a squatter camp in the Durban area in search of work.<span style="">&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>For almost six years now, she has lived in a shack made of scavenged wood, metal and plastic. She had been a member of the Amazioni religion that blends ancestral worship with Christianity until starting to attend the Christ Manor Church near her home last year.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>When she started our health builder training course, she earned money by washing the clothes of her neighbors.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>After regularly attending the church and studying the Bible with us, she was baptized.<span style="">&nbsp; </span><span style="">&nbsp;</span>Our teaching enabled her to encourage and educate HIV positive neighbors.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>She would even accompany them to medical appointments in order to help them meet the health clinic requirement of bringing someone to each visit as a support person.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>She became involved as a volunteer with an organization that does HIV/AIDS work in the community.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>When a staff position opened there, Thandi presented training materials that she studied with us and was hired!<span style="">&nbsp; </span>This job puts Thandi closer to her dream of owning her own small government-subsidized home.<span style="">&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><i style="">Let each of you look out not only for his own interests, but also for the interests of others. <span style="">&nbsp;</span>Philippians 2:4</i></p> Sun, 04 Oct 2009 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/14426-looking-out-for-the-interests-of-others https://internationalministries.org/read/14426-looking-out-for-the-interests-of-others Swine Flu Just One of Many Communicable Diseases IM Missionaries Face Daily <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"><meta name="ProgId" content="Word.Document"><meta name="Generator" content="Microsoft Word 12"><meta name="Originator" content="Microsoft Word 12"><link rel="File-List" href="file:///C:%5CUsers%5CTOBYCA%7E1%5CAppData%5CLocal%5CTemp%5Cmsohtmlclip1%5C01%5Cclip_filelist.xml"><o:smarttagtype namespaceuri="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" name="country-region"></o:smarttagtype><o:smarttagtype namespaceuri="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" name="place"></o:smarttagtype><link rel="themeData" href="file:///C:%5CUsers%5CTOBYCA%7E1%5CAppData%5CLocal%5CTemp%5Cmsohtmlclip1%5C01%5Cclip_themedata.thmx"><link rel="colorSchemeMapping" href="file:///C:%5CUsers%5CTOBYCA%7E1%5CAppData%5CLocal%5CTemp%5Cmsohtmlclip1%5C01%5Cclip_colorschememapping.xml"><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark/> <w:DontVertAlignCellWithSp/> <w:DontBreakConstrainedForcedTables/> <w:DontVertAlignInTxbx/> <w:Word11KerningPairs/> <w:CachedColBalance/> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> <m:mathPr> <m:mathFont m:val="Cambria Math"/> <m:brkBin m:val="before"/> <m:brkBinSub m:val="&#45;-"/> <m:smallFrac m:val="off"/> <m:dispDef/> <m:lMargin m:val="0"/> <m:rMargin m:val="0"/> <m:defJc m:val="centerGroup"/> <m:wrapIndent m:val="1440"/> <m:intLim m:val="subSup"/> <m:naryLim m:val="undOvr"/> </m:mathPr></w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" DefUnhideWhenUsed="true" DefSemiHidden="true" DefQFormat="false" DefPriority="99" LatentStyleCount="267"> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="0" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Normal"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="heading 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="toc 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="35" QFormat="true" Name="caption"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="10" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" Name="Default Paragraph Font"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="11" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtitle"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="22" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Strong"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="20" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="59" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Table Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Placeholder Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="No Spacing"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Revision"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="34" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="List Paragraph"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="29" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="30" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="19" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="21" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="31" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="32" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="33" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Book Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="37" Name="Bibliography"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" QFormat="true" Name="TOC Heading"/> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if !mso]><object classid="clsid:38481807-CA0E-42D2-BF39-B33AF135CC4D" id=ieooui></object> <style> st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } </style> <![endif]--><style> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:1; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-format:other; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 0 0 0 0 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1073750139 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} --> </style><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} </style> <![endif]--> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">The <st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">U.S.</st1:place></st1:country-region> is a wealthy country, a land of abundance where common diseases like the flu are usually not life-threatening.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Yet we are in the midst of an unusual medical scare.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>The appearance of the swine flu in the <st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">U.S.</st1:place></st1:country-region> has ignited fears of a lethal virus that is touching every city, burb and village in this great land.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">The widespread concerns raised in the <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:country-region w:st="on">U.S.</st1:country-region></st1:place> lead us to think about how the swine flu is affecting corners of the world that are not blessed with our abundant resources and advanced health care system.<span style="">&nbsp; </span><o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">International Ministries missionaries are so often at the epicenter of sudden and devastating viral pirates.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>If not acted upon quickly, diseases like the swine flu stampede through cities and villages, taking lives and leaving broken families in their devastating wake.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">For <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/artifacts/11052">IM missionaries in <st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Mexico</st1:place></st1:country-region></a>, where the flu strain was originally identified, the effect was felt mostly in the precautions taken by the government in shutting down schools and workplaces.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>In addition, the decrease in tourism further impacted local economies, already hurting as a result of the worldwide financial downturn.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">Of course, dealing with communicable diseases is nothing new for missionaries.<span style="">&nbsp; </span><a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/missionaries/57">Dr. Bill Clemmer</a>, medical missionary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) says that common cyclic epidemics in his area of the world include “cholera, typhoid, monkey pox, measles, and even hemorrhagic fever (Ebola).”<span style="">&nbsp; </span>For <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/missionaries/66">Dr. Rick Gutierrez</a>, medical missionary in <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:country-region w:st="on">South Africa</st1:country-region></st1:place>, the specter of HIV/AIDS is a sobering constant.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>In one rural Zulu community, he noted that “the pastor spends every Saturday doing one funeral after another the whole day because so many people are dying from HIV.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>It really is unbelievable.”</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">In Mexico, where confirmed swine flu cases have so far been responsible for more than 60 deaths, <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/missionaries/94">Dr. Adalia Schellinger Gutierrez</a> succinctly captured the balancing act missionaries face in trying to meet both the physical and spiritual needs of people.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>“</span><span style="font-family: &quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;" lang="EN">What worries me the most,” she said, in reference to the possibility of a sudden and devastating epidemic, “is losing the human/spiritual side of things as we become overwhelmed looking for ’survival,’ and we stop caring for other people.”</span><b style=""><span style="color: white;"><o:p></o:p></span></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">Disease carries with it a stigma that, unfortunately, keeps many away from helping to meet the needs of the infected.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>IM missionaries work to meet those needs, body and soul, and fight the battles against curable and, presently, incurable diseases in developing countries.</span></p> Wed, 20 May 2009 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/11529-swine-flu-just-one-of-many-communicable-diseases-im-missionaries-face-daily https://internationalministries.org/read/11529-swine-flu-just-one-of-many-communicable-diseases-im-missionaries-face-daily Truth and Mercy <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><span>Where does one run for truth and mercy near Donnybrook, South Africa? <span style="">&nbsp;</span>Today, as Pastor <span style="">&nbsp;</span>Bongamusa and I are ready to visit homes a tall, slender woman from the mountains of Lesotho is running toward us with her head wrapped in purple cloth.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><span>She has run about ½ a mile from the large Spar Grocery Market where many people have come to spend their pension and social grant payments which they stand in line to collect while security men keep order.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><span>Word is going around that the Baptists are helping people with HIV/AIDS to learn their status and there is no gossiping and betrayal of confidentiality. <span style="">&nbsp;</span>Many people report that they are scared to go for the test to the mobile clinic which visits this area because of perceptions that the nurses are cruel and would reveal people’s HIV positive status to their neighbors. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><span>The running woman from Lesotho catches her breath inside the church and asks us to check her CD4 count.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>If this count is below 250 in South Africa, anti-retroviral therapy is offered, along with a $45-60 dollar monthly grant from the state. After telling her we do not have the portable technology to run this special test, she is disappointed. <span style="">&nbsp;</span>I have been seeking and praying for this very equipment for the past three years. We pray for her. She goes away knowing our limitations and our desire to help in this way another day.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><span>When we arrived this morning, three women and their children were waiting for us. We set them to watching our HIV pretest video in Zulu and then commenced testing in the privacy of the church’s meeting place. Three out of four people we tested were positive today.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><span>One of the women cried as she held onto her four month old baby and saw the multiple lines appearing on the dual tests we ran confirming her status as HIV positive. She was disappointed because she had trusted in expensive sorcery herbs called “muthi” in Zulu. She fully believed the muthi would make her HIV go away. The sangoma (sorcerer) had charged her big money and made the false promise that the virus would disappear from her blood. Now she sees the truth through her tears. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><span>Pastor Bongamusa told her that these sorcery herbs cannot remove the virus, but with proper medicines she could live to become a gogo (old granny) and see her son’s children. As we prayed with her in the name of Jesus, she seemed inclined to believe us and she accepted our referral for treatment. Her baby boy appeared healthy and robust, but we cannot test him with our current technology.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><span>Our God has promised us truth and mercy. This is our heritage in Christ, and our duty to share with these lost people who trust in sorcery to cure their virus. A part of the truth we proclaim to increasing numbers of people here is that the virus is treatable and they can lead a full, long life if caught early enough. We do this with the love and mercy of saved persons. One person and one test at a time, we carry out our commission.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><span>Truth and mercy,</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><span>Rick Gutierrez </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><span><em>You will give truth to Jacob and mercy to Abraham which you have sworn to our fathers from days of old.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Micah 7:20</em></span></p> Tue, 17 Mar 2009 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/9946-truth-and-mercy https://internationalministries.org/read/9946-truth-and-mercy Ungesabi -- do not be afraid <p><img alt="Cato_manor_09" class="thumbnail" src="uploaded/cato_manor_09.08_008%283%29.300.jpg?1228518238">For the past few months, we have been training health builders in a squatter shack settlement in Cato Manor.&nbsp; I have yet to shake a mild sense of claustrophobia when I go down the narrow corridor separating the shacks and enter the one room home of our hostess.&nbsp; Dirt shows through the broken parts of heavy plastic covering the ground.&nbsp; On this day, I wonder how I would react if a rat ran through the shack built from odd bits of discarded wood, metal and plastic. &nbsp;<br><br>We start our session by continuing our Bible study with our students.&nbsp; A neighbour wanders in and joins the study.&nbsp; Like most of the people in the area, she practices a blend of traditional African ancestral worship and Christianity.&nbsp; This day we study Deuteronomy 18 and what the Bible says about spiritual powers.&nbsp; While discussing these things, we can hear a number of voices mumbling together from a nearby shack so I ask what they are saying.&nbsp; Our hostess explains that her neighbor thought that there was a Tokoloshe in her shack last night and was terrified so people are praying this morning.&nbsp; A Tokoloshe is an evil spiritual being which looks like a small hairy man and is widely feared by Zulus.&nbsp; On our visits to Zulu homes, we have commonly seen people’s beds propped up on bricks in order to deter the Tokoloshe.&nbsp; People who are thought to possess spiritual power are paid to pray over things like water, salt and thick black cleaning fluid that are placed around homes to ward off evil spirits. Today is hot and humid and I see beads of sweat form on the visitors’s forehead.<br><img alt="Cato_manor_09" class="thumbnail" src="uploaded/cato_manor_09.08_007%282%29.300.jpg?1228518251"><br>After the Bible study, we teach the students how to measure blood sugar and keep medical records.&nbsp; Thandi confesses that she feels shaky.&nbsp; We encourage her and explain that it is normal to feel some level of anxiety while learning new skills. The students screen some of the neighbours.<br><br>Thandi has lived here for five years and hopes that the government will soon provide her with a small house.&nbsp; Many residents have left children, wives and parents in rural areas so that they can find work in the city.&nbsp; Diabetes, heart disease, stroke and AIDS are widespread and loved ones are commonly seriously ill or dying.&nbsp; The inhabitants have no bathrooms, refrigerators, stoves, washers or dryers.&nbsp; Lately, it has rained on most days which results in a thick slimy mud which covers children when they play outside.&nbsp; In the windowless shacks at night, no electric lights can be quickly switched on to investigate mysterious noises.&nbsp; I wonder how people can cope with all of this as it takes far less to discourage me.&nbsp; &nbsp;<br><br><img alt="Cato_manor_09" class="thumbnail" src="uploaded/cato_manor_09.08_002.300.jpg?1228518267">Thandi has to wash some clothes for her neighbours and do other chores so we only stay about an hour and a half.&nbsp; Before we leave, we give Thandi a Zulu tract.&nbsp; A smile lights up her face as she reads the title, “Ungesabi.”&nbsp; We remember that it means, “Do not be afraid.”&nbsp; <br> <br> </p> Thu, 04 Dec 2008 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/8156-ungesabi-do-not-be-afraid https://internationalministries.org/read/8156-ungesabi-do-not-be-afraid When God opens doors <p>Dear Friends,&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;</p><p><br>Last week we spent a day at the rural Zulu village of Matendeni, South Africa in the Drakensberg&nbsp; Mountains.&nbsp; This week we added the words inkungu (fog), liyana (it is raining), udaka (mud) and limakhaza (it is cold) to our vocabulary.&nbsp; We were not able to drive into the village due to mud that was as slippery as ice.&nbsp; Praise God that we were not stuck while attempting the heavily rutted roads that comprise the last two miles of our journey.&nbsp;&nbsp; Pastor Bongamusa arranged for us to park in the yard of a group of huts.&nbsp; We showed our gratitude by giving a soccer ball from members of the West Virginia Baptist Convention to the children that had gathered to observe us.&nbsp; They immediately began to play catch.</p><p><br>The rain let up and we walked over some stones through a shallow river and climbed up a tall hillside to take the short cut to our health builder training site. &nbsp;</p><p><br>Twenty-seven year old Pastor Bongamusa was trained at a Baptist seminary on the south coast of KwaZulu-Natal.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; We met him through our main partner denomination, the Baptist Mission of South Africa.&nbsp; Pastor Bongamusa told us that many doors have opened to him since we have been going out with him into the community to measure blood pressure.&nbsp; He said that people appreciate that the Baptist church is working to be relevant to their needs.&nbsp; They are glad that members of their own community will be trained in much needed health skills.&nbsp;&nbsp; Pastor Bongamusa, who planted a church there in February 2008, said that some people had been put off by bad experiences with churches that “criticize what people do, but don’t teach.”&nbsp; &nbsp;</p><p><br>One man who engages in traditional ancestral worship was hostile to Pastor Bongamusa’s church planting efforts.&nbsp; Last week, the man invited Pastor Bongamusa into his home and requested that the pastor pray for him and his family.&nbsp; Other doors have opened for group Bible study meetings.&nbsp; Pastor Bongamusa encourages questions and discussion.&nbsp; Many of the health builders from poorer backgrounds that we train have chaotic life situations.&nbsp; Health builder trainee Rose had two siblings die of different illnesses a few weeks ago.&nbsp; One died of complications related to high blood pressure.&nbsp;&nbsp; They were buried on the same day. &nbsp;</p><p><br>Despite the recent loss of her siblings, Rose enthusiastically participated in training that day.&nbsp; Pastor Bongamusa was an excellent translator.&nbsp; She had many questions and enjoyed the opportunity to study and think about how the Bible applies to her life situation.&nbsp;&nbsp; Our hosts eventually brought in a small electric heater for us that they borrowed from their neighbours.&nbsp; This took the edge off the cold. &nbsp;</p><p><img alt="Hats" class="thumbnail" src="uploaded/hats.compressed.300.jpg?1224265914"><br>At this session, we showed our video on high blood pressure in Zulu.&nbsp; The students successfully measured the blood pressure of the people in the household.&nbsp; By the time we were ready to walk back down to our car, the rain and periodic thunder had mercifully ceased. &nbsp;</p><p><br>Before leaving, we stopped to thank Rose’s mom for the chicken, tomato and rice meal and tea that she served.&nbsp; We found Rose’s parents and her 4-year-old nephew with cerebral palsy in the next-door thatched hut by a small fire in the middle on the floor.&nbsp; They were resting on mats on the ground in order to avoid the smoke.&nbsp; There was no chimney so they kept the door open.&nbsp; We offered our condolences for their recent losses and prayed with them.</p><p><br>Your support of the World Mission Offering enables us to equip churches, reach people for Jesus and build health skills in Matendeni. </p><p><br>Thank you, </p><p><br>Rick and Anita Gutierrez</p> Mon, 13 Oct 2008 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/7845-when-god-opens-doors https://internationalministries.org/read/7845-when-god-opens-doors Outreach to rural Zulu community <p style="font-style: italic;">“For this is the will of My Father, that everyone who beholds the Son and believes in Him, may have eternal life; and I Myself will raise him up on the last day.” John 6:40</p><p><br><img alt="Bulwer_125e" class="thumbnail" src="uploaded/bulwer_125e.300.jpg?1220029459">Our Baptist partners here in Durban are responding to the call to plant churches in surrounding rural areas.&nbsp; On August 22-24, I traveled with 20 members of Phoenix Baptist Church to the settlement of Mathendeni. We worked with young Pastor Bongamusa (age 26) who is planting a Baptist church there.&nbsp; I screened people for diabetes, high blood pressure and HIV.</p><p><br>Recently it has been shown that treating HIV patients with powerful anti-retroviral drugs (ARVs) can lead to a life expectancy of 64-70 years for a twenty year old that is HIV positive. That flies in the face of common perceptions about HIV here, where people are expecting to die shortly after they are diagnosed. This weekend, 20 percent of the people I screened were HIV positive. Working with Pastor Bongamusa as a translator, we were able to encourage them to be treated and to avoid passing on the infection to others. One man said to me that while he was unhappy to know he had HIV, he was very appreciative of being tested. ARV treatment is available about 15 miles away. Now that he knows he is infected, he will go there for treatment.&nbsp; Only 10 percent of South Africans are tested for HIV.&nbsp; In South Africa today, about 480,000 people receive ARVs, out of an estimated 1.7 million who would be candidates.&nbsp; There are about 5.7 million South Africans who are HIV positive. </p><p><br>Some of the people who discovered they were HIV positive also came to the Jesus film on Saturday night and came forward for prayer at the Sunday worship. This past weekend some 30 people accepted an invitation to make Jesus their Lord and Saviour.</p><p><img alt="Bulwer_129e" class="thumbnail" src="uploaded/bulwer_129e.300.jpg?1220029455"><br>During the upcoming months, Anita and I will be spending one day a week training members of the Baptist Church of Mathendeni to be health builders. We look forward to following up with people that I met this past weekend. We are excited to be able to further develop the language and other skills which will be able to service the rural Zulu community. We will help extend lives, prevent transmission of HIV, disciple new believers, and bring Zulu Bibles. We will help young Pastor Bongamusa to help this new Baptist church plant to thrive and grow.</p><p><br>Your giving towards our mission will help us as we invest in the ministry of this Baptist church of Mathendeni. Please pray for Pastor Bongamusa and the team as we build capacity for life in the rural areas. </p><p><br>Siyabonga (we thank you),</p><p><br>Rick Gutierrez</p> Thu, 28 Aug 2008 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/7589-outreach-to-rural-zulu-community https://internationalministries.org/read/7589-outreach-to-rural-zulu-community Combating a silent killer in Africa <p>We are all aware of images of death and destruction in Africa, from Ebola, HIV/AIDS, drought, famine, war or violence. At times these are too big for us to countenance. While it seldom captures media attention or headlines- there is a silent killer which we can grasp by a squeeze of the arm, a turn of the thumb, a watchful eye and a vigilant ear. I am of course writing about high blood pressure, the major cause of stroke which in turn is the major cause of long-term disability in Africa. </p><p><br>On May 14 we had an excellent day of training and equipping African missionaries who serve in rural Zululand and urban pockets of poverty here in the Durban area. Thirty-seven men and women reported to blood pressure boot camp, where Dr. Anita and I along with three of our health builders and three volunteer nurses spent the day training and instructing these servants of Christ in all things blood pressure. I manufactured special two-headed stethoscopes so that each instructor could simultaneously hear what our students were hearing. At the end of the day this was a great success in large scale teaching.</p><p><br>Africans have over twice the risk for stroke as people of European ancestry in South Africa. Giving them the skills and tools to screen for this problem and monitor the treatment is a great health investment into Africa.&nbsp; On this day, we equipped each student with an hour long DVD we made about checking blood pressure. We also provided blood pressure equipment. The total cost of materials was about $21 per trainee. The students donated 1/3 of that cost, and the hosting church sponsored the other 2/3 as well as provided lunch. We celebrate this collaboration in mission. </p><p><br>To those of you who have made this ministry possible, I’m passing along a copy of an e-mail we got this week from one of our William Carey students last year, who has returned to Zambia to minister. Thank you for your investment in quietly saving Africa for Christ and from strokes and heart attacks. </p><p><br>Yours in Christ,</p><p><br>Rick Gutierrez</p><p><br>The e-mail:</p><p><br>Hello Doctors Rick &amp; Anita.</p><p><br>Hope all is well with you and your family.</p><p><br>It is with great pleasure that I write this mail to you just to say thank you for the way you equipped me at William Carey School of World Missions in South Africa last year. To be honest with you, when you were teaching us how to check blood pressure I never thought that I would use the skills you were giving us.</p><p><br>Where I have planted a church it’s in a shanty compound, and we have also formed a home based care group and we have adopted about 20 clients (patients) on whom we have also done the HIV tests and most of them are HIV positive and have even being put on ARVs. Other patients have got high blood pressure, on Wednesday I was checking one on her blood pressure and it was 120/85.</p><p><br>The church is growing and all is well with me.</p><p><br>Once again thank you so much for the skills and also for the BP machine.&nbsp; May God richly bless you all as you continue to train other students at the William Carey School of World Missions.</p><p><br>PASTOR BLESSINGS SAMBO, LAST YEAR STUDENT FROM ZAMBIA.</p><p><br></p> Sun, 08 Jun 2008 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/5790-combating-a-silent-killer-in-africa https://internationalministries.org/read/5790-combating-a-silent-killer-in-africa Today I learned I was HIV positive <p>Imagine you are a 20-year-old South African man, who has just flunked out of high-school. You live on the rural border of a large city, where you travel each day for about $1.50 to study the courses you failed, so that you can get the equivalent of a GED to qualify for better work. These courses are math, biology and physical sciences. Your schooling to date took place in crowed classes with 60 students per room, and your teachers would often not show up for class for weeks out of the year. Teachers as a group have high HIV rates.</p><p><br />To finance your studies, you work odd jobs as they are available. You aspire to formal employment, but your lack of high school graduation stands in your way to compete for such work, and there is a 40 percent unemployment rate in your area. You are soft-spoken, personable and handsome. </p><p><br />Today you are travelling with neighbours to a local church where people are doing a presentation about HIV/AIDS and testing for a variety of common conditions. You come along to help your elderly neighbour lady walk up the hill to get to the meeting. </p><p><br />While you are there, you get into a conversation with an American missionary and relate the above information. </p><p><br />An hour later, after being tested for HIV by a trained church member, that same missionary is called in to confirm that you have HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The test results are unequivocal, and today is the day you learn that you are HIV positive.</p><p><br />After the initial shock, your greatest fear is that you will be denied employment because of your HIV positive status. All you have been working to achieve suddenly seems out of reach. Fortunately for you, you live in South Africa where it is illegal for employers to discriminate on the basis of a person’s HIV status. </p><p><br />You are still healthy, and four months ago you tested HIV negative at a local clinic. You have been involved briefly with a young woman since then, but there was trouble between you, and you are not currently speaking with her.</p><p><br />The missionary asks you if you will find this person and ask her to also be tested. You refuse to do this, as this is not expected of you in South Africa. Health workers are not allowed to report your personal status to the public health authorities, and case contacts are not made. </p><p><br />You are encouraged to seek further care at the local government clinic, where the most modern medications for HIV are available. You have been picked up very early in the disease process, and have a normal life expectancy, which the missionary emphasizes to you. You are counselled in ways to avoid spreading the infection. </p><p><br />This happened this past Saturday. About one of every 10 men in South Africa is HIV positive. Thanks to your support, we are able to diagnose them early and offer them hope and information, which is lacking in many settings here. The church equipped to screen for common health problems has much to offer people in need. Please pray for this young man as he continues his studies, that he may enter the work force on his own terms, and live a long and illness-free life. He does plan to attend health classes which we will offer in the local church for his rural community.</p> Thu, 03 Apr 2008 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/5444-today-i-learned-i-was-hiv-positive https://internationalministries.org/read/5444-today-i-learned-i-was-hiv-positive Cato Manor Outreach <p>Dear Friends,<br /><br /><img class="thumbnail" src="/uploaded/people_come_for_screening_cato_manor.300.jpg?1205948290" alt="People_come_for_screening_cato_manor" />Recently, we participated in a local government organized annual health screening day in Cato Manor. Cato Manor is a predominately black African community near to downtown Durban. Cato Manor has a history of inter-racial violence and still struggles with a high crime rate. Even so, eight of our health builders from five different Durban area churches were eager to join us for the day. Our health builders know the Lord Jesus, and they are not afraid to be witnesses of the love and healing of Christ by serving in places like Cato Manor, where this witness in both appreciated and needed. As I left a little boy said to me, “I want to help you; I want to be a doctor when I grow up.” This is the usual sort of reception that our health builders get, a good welcome from the people. <img class="thumbnail" src="/uploaded/cato_manor_patient_screening_e.300.jpg?1205948492" alt="Cato_manor_patient_screening_e" /><br /><br />We had an excellent day of Zulu dancing, gospel singing, food, fellowship, health screening, counseling, and referral. We were joined by HIV counselors of the Treatment Action Campaign, as well as by some doctors from a local church. The local health department contributed some medical supplies. We set up eight private stations for testing for HIV, blood sugar and blood pressure. On this day, we found of 63 persons we screened for HIV that 12% were positive, 13% of the women and 9% of the men tested. Of note, 60 percent of the people had abnormal or elevated blood pressure, some critically so, and about 15% had abnormal blood sugar. We were able to provide counseling and referral on the spot, in association with the local clinics, the local government, and the skilled Zulu counselors we had available. Follow-up health education was offered at a local church.<img class="thumbnail" src="/uploaded/health_builders_cato_manor.300.jpg?1205948283" alt="Health_builders_cato_manor" /><br /><br />At the end of the day a doctor who was present told me that last year only three people agreed to be tested for HIV at a similar event at Cato Manor in commemoration of World AIDS day. What was different about what we did? Why did 63 people agree to be tested at the screening this December? A nurse that we trained in health building at a Cato Manor church introduced the idea of addressing a broader array of problems to the local government officials. This approach removes stigma, enhances confidentiality and treats HIV like any other disease. About 80% of the people we screened wanted HIV testing. The local government authorities were very pleased with the performance of our Health Builders, and would like to have more events like this one. We hope that this sort of positive collaboration will help us get official recognition for our health builder program. We intend to train local people to do health screening in the future. <img class="thumbnail" src="/uploaded/cato_manor_1.300.jpg" alt="Cato_manor_1" /><br /><br />Jesus Christ came into the world, and His earthly ministry was accompanied by many healing miracles, attesting to his Messiahship. Today we are called to bring the mercy of Christ to men and women who are suffering with diseases, to point them to effective treatment and living, and to share about Jesus who saves for eternity. Jesus is the door to eternal life, and we thank you for allowing us to be witnesses here in Durban, where we the church are doing what the clinics have been unable to do in the past. This is our witness to our Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord who heals men and women. We covet your prayers and support for this ground-breaking mission to go forward in South Africa, where men and women hunger for the bread of life named Jesus, and whose bodies need healing from HIV, hypertension, and diabetes among others. <br /><br />Grace and Truth, <br /><br />Rick and Anita Gutierrez <br /> </p> Thu, 10 Jan 2008 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/4671-cato-manor-outreach https://internationalministries.org/read/4671-cato-manor-outreach Surprised by the power of forgiveness And when ye stand praying, forgive, if ye have aught against any: that your Father also which is in heaven may forgive you your trespasses. (Mark 11: 25) We recently arrived back to South Africa, and have been settling back in and visiting our partners in mission. Thank you all who made our year in America so fruitful for the service we are now here to render. Our partners are very glad to have us back, and thank you for sending us. On a recent Sunday, I attended two different worship settings with a common theme. In the morning we worshipped in a multi-ethnic setting with the message brought by an Afrikaner pastor named Mark. Pastor Mark talked about how some people have experienced racial discrimination, sexual abuse or other serious disappointments in their past. He warned that we can get trapped by our past experiences in way that robs us of the ability to carry out God’s call for our life in the present. He reminded us that we only have one life to serve God. That Sunday evening, I attended the opening of a week of tent crusade meetings in a predominantly Indian area north of Durban. The evangelist was of Asian Indian descent named Mark. He shared how he was very active in the struggle against Apartheid, how he was often jailed for his activism, and how he hated the whites who had taken away his family farm when he was a boy of ten. Two months later, his father died. Later he became an evangelist, but found that his ministry lacked power until he realized that his hatred of the whites which had oppressed his family and caused the premature death of his father needed to be dealt with. He dealt with this by writing letters of forgiveness to all those who had been involved personally with his family’s case of oppression. An Afrikaner politician named Marias wrote him back and indicated that his forgiveness was accepted. Evangelist Mark told us that a dam burst in his evangelistic ministry after being liberated from the burden of anger and resentment that he carried. The message of evangelist Mark brought to mind the witness of Anita’s grandfather Balint Ficsor back in Hungary. Papa Ficsor, a Baptist, had been a successful peasant farmer before Stalinism overran Hungary and took away his farm and possessions. It was evident however that Papa Ficsor had forgiven the Russians, and he told many amusing stories about how he had become friendly with the local Russian soldiers who had overseen his village. At the time, I never understood how he could forgive the people who had taken everything away from him. Evangelist Mark would have understood perfectly, and now I do as well. Who do you need to forgive for God to move powerfully in your life? How will men and women see your love for Jesus in this, and be amazed? Rick Gutierrez Tue, 04 Sep 2007 10:38:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/3536-surprised-by-the-power-of-forgiveness https://internationalministries.org/read/3536-surprised-by-the-power-of-forgiveness Helping Hearts in Africa <span> <p><span>Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.Matthew 5:8 </span></p> <p><span>In the African health context, the first thing that comes to many people's minds is HIV/AIDS. A July 2004 UNAIDS report estimated that 7.5 percent of sub-Saharan Africans are infected with HIV, the virus which causes AIDS. This past year we trained lay health builder students in HIV/AIDS prevention, testing and home care.</span></p> <p><span>When people think of health problems in Africa, few people think of heart and artery disease. In the majority of African countries, AIDS deaths are roughly equal to deaths from heart and artery disease.Yet few resources have been directed towards this growing killer. Because of urbanisation and an increasing standard of living, heart disease is predicted to become the biggest overall killer in Africa over the next 20 years.Africans who are living in areas which are increasingly more industrialized are eating more fats, sugar and meats.In our area of South Africa, the traditional African diet consists mainly of dried corn, beans, curdled milk, a root called madumbis and sweet pumpkin.We witness how industrialization is beginning to affect the eating patterns of local Africans. We see local African workers in the stores buying white bread, beer, potato chips, French fries and sugary drinks.</span></p> <p><span>In Africa more than 20 million people suffer from high blood pressure.According to a June 17, 2005 report issued by the World Health Organization, currently between 25 to 35 percent of African adults aged 24 – 65 have high blood pressure.</span><span>This puts them at higher risk for coronary heart disease, heart failure, kidney failure, dementia and stroke. Black Africans are particularly vulnerable to stroke.Prevention and control of high blood pressure could avoid at least 250,000 premature deaths per year. </span></p> <p><span>This past summer and fall, we trained lay health builder students through the William Carey School of Mission.Some of the students had never seen a blood pressure cuff before taking our course.After completing one year of missionary training, 43 students graduated in January 2006 and most returned to their home countries of Zambia, South Africa, Lesotho, Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Malawi.Your donations made it possible to provide each of them with blood pressure cuffs of different sizes, a stethoscope and an educational DVD on heart and artery disease as a graduation present.</span></p> <p><span>During our outreach into the rural community next to the William Carey School, we encountered a man with high blood pressure who is homebound due to a stroke.<span> <img src="/uploaded/checking%20man%20who%20had%20a%20stroke.jpg" alt="" /> </span>His wife explained to us that she could not transport him to his doctor for the past two years.The basic medical screening tests that we provided for him in his home provided his doctor with much needed information on the status of his medical problems.</span></p> <p><span>Stroke is a major cause of death worldwide and the biggest single cause of disability in Africa and worldwide.Each year around the world, 15 million people suffer a stroke.Of these, five million die and another five million are left permanently disabled, placing a heavy burden on individuals, families and communities.</span></p> <p><span>We conclude that it is a most worthwhile investment of our time and skills and your resources to train up lay missionaries who are also equipped with practical medical skills here in Africa.Together, we have an excellent present and future in our battle against disease in the body and in the spirit.We have found that we can disciple men and women for Christ and train them to also address these physical problems as a manifestation of the mercy and love of our Lord Jesus Christ.</span></p> <p><span>Your brother and sister in Christ,</span></p> <p><span>Rick and Anita Gutierrez</span></p> <p></span> </p> Mon, 13 Feb 2006 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/1137-helping-hearts-in-africa https://internationalministries.org/read/1137-helping-hearts-in-africa Lay Health Builder Training at the William Carey S <p><span>About fifteen years ago, the Lord moved Pastor Leslie James and his congregation to build a church among sugar cane fields in a rural area north of </span></p> <p><span>In Africa, obesity, strokes, heart disease, diabetes and kidney disease are becoming more and more common.Church members equipped with simple and relatively inexpensive medical instruments and basic practical skills can detect early disease and promote lifestyle change.God offers opportunities to share the Gospel in word and deed in the setting of the loving and caring relationships that are established through this type of health ministry</span></p> <p><span>We have had a moving response from our students, some of whom have been very involved with HIV/AIDS work back home in their home countries. Some had <img src="/uploaded/taking%20blood%20pressure.jpg" alt="Pastor Akafekwa measures the blood pressure of William Carey staff member Paul M." />never seen a blood pressure cuff before.They now have practical skills in assessing for heart and artery disease risk factors. One of our students in the class is Pastor Akafekwa from Zambia.He described two miraculous healings a few years ago of paralysis from strokes that his doctors told him were related to his untreated high blood pressure.He committed his life to Christ after the healings but never took his blood pressure medicine.During our course, he learned that his blood pressure was high.He was started on blood pressure medication and as a result his pressure is now normal.We have been invited to work with local doctors and nurses in these countries to set up similar training through the local churches. Our goal is to develop training materials and methods so that medical missionaries as well as local doctors and nurses can use our materials to train church members.These opportunities to teach in a variety of settings allow us to field test our training materials so that they can be more effective and practical.<br /><br /></span></p> <p><span>I am now teaching the students from William Carey on HIV testing and home based care to persons with HIV related infection. Some of our students are eager to work with us as we write HIV/AIDS training materials tailor made for church based ministries.They challenge us to write from a biblically based perspective, in combination with clinical insight. We are listening carefully to our students as they share their thoughts and experiences. </span></p> <p><span>In Christ,</span></p> <p><span>Rick Gutierrez</span></p> <p><span>For more pictures from the William Carey School of World Mission go to <a href="http://www.bethelhealthbuilders.org/">www.bethelhealthbuilders.org</a></span></p> Tue, 06 Sep 2005 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/1136-lay-health-builder-training-at-the-william-carey-s https://internationalministries.org/read/1136-lay-health-builder-training-at-the-william-carey-s Screening in Amouti <p><i><span>Jesus said, "Simon son of John, do you truly love me?" He answered, "Yes, Lord, you know that I love you."Jesus said, "Take care of my sheep."John 21:16</span></i></p> <p><span>Lay health builder student Siyabonga (Eastbury Baptist Church) is from an informal settlement outside of Phoenix called Amouti.About 20,000 people live in Amouti.Some residents are from rural areas in Kwa-Zulu Natal and earn money that they take back to their relatives.The inhabitants are squatting on this land and have built make-shift homes.They work as security guards, janitors, construction workers, gardeners, maids and in sugar cane fields and factories.<img src="/uploaded/amouti.jpg" alt="" />Most homes in Amouti only have one room.Some of the homes have electric meter boxes in them that accept pre-paid cards so that the residents can buy electricity in 5 to 10 Rand increments (about $1).Each home receives a certain amount of free electricity each month. </span><span>The meter boxes have smiley faces and frowning faces to indicate how much electricity is left.There is no running water in the homes.</span></p> <p><span>The rate of HIV infection is at least 30 %.This summer we hope to begin to train people in HIV/AIDS education and screening.</span></p> <p><span>Siyabonga'sfather was a traditional herbalist/healer but became a Christian when Siyabonga was a boy.Siyabonga told us that he clearly remembers the day that his father threw away all the items related to his sorcery practices.His father told Siyabonga never to follow those practices like he had done.Siyabonga told us that after the Bible study that is part of the lay health builder curriculum, he now understands his father's decision to leave the practice of sorcery.</span></p> <p><span>His father died a few months ago at age 78.Siyabonga believes that his father would have been pleased that he is becoming a lay health builder and this gives him some comfort after his father's death.We gave Siyabonga a NIV Zondervan study Bible. Siyabonga made the decision to give his life over to Jesus Christ and will be baptized on May 1, 2005.We can see a new calmness, peace and confidence in Siyabonga since he made the decision to accept Jesus Christ as Lord and Savoir.When we first met Siyabonga he had a drawn, guarded look but now we are frequently blessed by his smile.</span></p> <p><span>Siyabonga is aware of five sorcerers operating in his neighbourhood.Sorcerers manipulate spiritual powers in order to achieve their ends.Much to Siyabonga's alarm, his girlfriend Thandi was taken out of the hospital against medical advice a few weeks ago.Her mother did this in order to take her daughter to a sorcerer.The treatment involved shutting Thandi into a room filled with smoke.We prayed for his girlfriend and she has made a full recovery.He is doing the Bible study on spiritual powers from our course with his girlfriend.</span></p> <p><span>Rick is training Siyabonga in his neighbourhood to screen for and teach about heart and artery disease risk factors.About one-third of the people that <img src="/uploaded/siyabonga%20screening.jpg" alt="" />Siyabonga screened have high blood pressure.If this condition is left untreated, it can lead to stroke, heart attack and kidney failure.The last man to be screened on April 19 was 55 years old and had a blood pressure of 274/140 which is dangerously high.At first the man refused to go to the hospital for treatment.He was worried that if word got out that he was in the hospital overnight, people would steal his things from his home.The crime is so bad in Amouti that his fears are well-founded.He said that he did not trust anyone he knew to watch his home.Widespread failure to obey God's commandment on stealing can serve to keep people in a vicious cycle of poverty.Through our ministry we hope to show people the life that is to be found by trusting and obeying the Lord.</span></p> <p><span>The man with the dangerously high blood pressure finally agreed to obtain medical care.Rick drove this man to the hospital.He has since returned home and nothing was stolen from him.Siyabonga will visit this man and recheck his blood pressure.He will teach him more about the importance of controlling high blood pressure and following up with his doctor.</span></p> <p><span>For more pictures see <a href="http://www.bethelhealthbuilders.org/">www.bethelhealthbuilders.org</a>.</span></p> <p><span>Yours in Christ,</span></p> <p><span>Anita Gutierrez</span></p> Sun, 24 Apr 2005 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/1135-screening-in-amouti https://internationalministries.org/read/1135-screening-in-amouti Screening Outreach at a Textile Factory <p><span>I went on a screening outreach to a small textile factory called "303 Designs" inDurban. Two of our trainee lay health builders Claudine and Lucy were able to screen about twenty men and women who worked in this factory for cardiovascular disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, smoking, high cholesterol, diabetes and central obesity.Educational materials were also made available.Strict confidentiality was observed.</span></p> <p><span>We were invited by the owner of the factory to offer this screening.This was the sort of factory that once was common in America, and some of our readers<img src="/uploaded/overweight%20textile%20worker.jpg" alt="" /> will remember serving in shops and factories like this when they were younger.This sort of industry is now the economic backbone and engine which is driving South Africa's emerging economy, and employs most of the people who have work</span> <span>. </span></p> <p><span>In between the bustle of the busy factory floor which was filling orders for T-shirts in Johannesburg, we were able to set up a screening station on the billiard table in the small main office. The soft felt surface of the table cover was actually comfortable for resting people's arms and testing blood pressures. </span></p> <p><span>We opened with prayer, and the people knew that this was all for the glory of the name of Jesus Christ. Jesus cares about health, and he will meet people in their homes or at work places through our ministry. </span></p> <p><span>Some people were afraid of being poked for sugar and cholesterol tests at <img src="/uploaded/blood%20screening.jpg" alt="Blood screening" />first, but they changed their minds after being reassured by other workers.All in all, it was a very encouraging session for our trainees, who are getting more confident and less stressed in carrying out this screening. The gospel is also served by health screening where people work.This is faith in action and a demonstration of Jesus' love in the workplace.</span></p> <p><span>For more photos, see our website <a href="http://www.bethelhealthbuilders.org/">www.bethelhealthbuilders.org</a></span></p> <p><span>Yours in Christ,</span></p> <p><span>Rick Gutierrez</span></p> Mon, 28 Mar 2005 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/1134-screening-outreach-at-a-textile-factory https://internationalministries.org/read/1134-screening-outreach-at-a-textile-factory Rejoice Your Names Are Written In the Book of Life <p><span>Yesterday afternoon I went out with two new health building trainees, Lully and Claudine from Eastbury Baptist Church, Phoenix. Lully is a 49 year old woman whose parents were missionaries from India to South Africa, and Claudine is a young mother of two girls. Last week they learned the skills of blood pressure determination, central obesity and body mass index determination, and teaching and encouraging people with these problems, as well as referral. They are in a class of six, all capable of carrying out this ministry. We are getting them out quickly into the field for practice in combining evangelism and practical health outreach. Class runs from 0830 to 1230, and the afternoon and evening are open fro screening and outreach. These past two afternoons have been interesting. How much can be uncovered by even beginning health builders is amazing. </span></p> <p><span>Among the people that were screened yesterday included three members of a Moslem family. The father S. is 44 and drives a bus, a stressful occupation here in South Africa. We stand in the front doorway of Claudine's apartment, with the smell of marijuana (commonly smoked by blacks and Indians here) in the air. S. flicks a cigarette and tells me about his work, as we look out at his blue bus parked in the grass in front of the row of tenements. Both he and his wife are overweight, and Claudine measures them carefully and demonstrates their waist to hip ratios and body mass indexes to them. The wife wants S. to get his pressure checked, and he is reluctant to have this measured. "I know it is normal, when it is high I feel weak and then I take a pill." We measure his pressure and it was in the high normal range. He was relieved to know this, and then told me that four years ago when he was 40 he suffered his first heart attack. He was supposed to have an angiogram after he was in the hospital for a week, but never followed up. Also, he is supposed to be on pressure and cholesterol medication, but does not take these. He is a smoker. We have an excellent interchange and he will be back to have his cholesterol and sugar tested when the ladies have learned these skills next week. Interestingly, he did not want any records recorded of this visit, as is our standard procedure. I wonder if he fears that his heart disease if known to the authorities would cause him to lose his bus driving license, and his livelihood. We will have much to address with him in future visits.Later, his 18 year old daughter came in for screening and asked how her dad was doing, and what his pressure was. We are teaching our lay health builders about confidentiality, and Claudine tells the daughter that he is doing fine but that she would have to ask him about his pressure herself. I learned today that S. uses his bus to drive people to a large praise and worship service on Tuesday nights, and that this Moslem man actually attended the service on occasion. He told his daughter that he liked the prayer in the service. Claudine plans to join this group on a Tuesday night. The Lord seems to be preparing this family for a closer encounter with Jesus, and our ministry of health building can be another means of making this connection real. </span></p> <p><span>Yesterdays screening also turned up a severely high blood pressure in a 76 year old Hindu woman who has a popular prayer altar at her home. She was referred to her doctor and accepted our Christian prayers for health quite graciously, which was a real surprise for Claudine, the lay health builder. </span></p> <p><span>Anita was screening with the health builders Kathy, Eva, and Maliga at the Phoenix Baptist Church clinic yesterday. They discovered a Hindu man with previously undiagnosed diabetes and elevated blood pressure. He was prayed for and referred for further care. </span></p> <p><span>This afternoon we had an outreach at the home of Natalie, a fifty something year old "colored" woman who is from Eastbury Baptist Church. The coloreds are a group of people who are essentially mixed between European, African, and Malay ancestry. They are most common near Cape Town, but they sometimes married Indians, even though this was illegal under the apartheid system. The segregation of those days often placed Indian and Colored families near one another. Natalie is married to an Indian man. </span></p> <p><span>Of the three men we screened this afternoon, all had elevated blood pressures. Two were previously undiagnosed. One was a 51 year old Hindu man, RR, who owns his own business. He appears strong and healthy but for a moderate paunch, but this belies his blood pressure. It was severely elevated at 188/112 and he was planning to jog 10K after this visit. He tells me that he knows that stress is causing this, and relates to me some of his business problems, which include fraud and deceit by others. I have no problem believing this earnest appearing man, and have seen my share of fraud and deceit in two years here in South Africa as well. He agrees to walk his 10K instead of running it and will be seeing a doctor tomorrow to check into this blood pressure. He accepts prayer in the name of Jesus Christ for his health and business concerns, despite the Lukshmi band about his wrist. This band signifies devotion to Lukshmi, the Hindu goddess of wealth, very popular here in Durban. </span></p> <p><span>Tomorrow I will be screening with Siyabonga, a young Zulu man who cleans the church and just lost his dad at age 71. When his father died of a stroke two months ago, Siyabonga inherited his job. This is a tradition in South Africa when a black domestic worker dies of AIDS or other causes. He has been a good student so far. He speaks quietly and has obviously suffered much in his life. His face and arms bear the traditional scars of initiation into Zulu manhood.Since his father has died, he is now in charge of the family, and is the only one working. Cleaning the Indian church is not a high paying job. He reads well, understands the use of tables to determine body mass index and waist to hip ratios, and takes blood pressures with confidence. The other health builders are scared to have me go to his place in the township of Mobeni, as the Indians are in general afraid of the Zulus. I don't want to miss the opportunity to share the gospel and screen these people with Siyabonga. The Zulu are mostly a lost people. I will go by day and pray that the Lord will keep me safe with Siyabonga.</span></p> <p><span>As a missionary, it is always nice when the locals accept you and your work. Here is a note that we received today:</span></p> <p><i><span style="COLOR: black; ">Dear Rick</span></i></p> <p><i><span style="COLOR: black; "><br />Thank you for the wonderful Ministry you and your good wife are doing in our church. The group can't stop talking about you two. I have not seen such enthusiasm and zeal in those ladies ever, until now.</span></i></p> <p><i><span style="COLOR: black; ">Rick, what you are doing is so needed in our community. Heart disease, high blood pressure, sugar diabetes is so common in our community, and your ministry is so needed. Thanks for the time and sacrifice you make for our church. We all pray for your Ministry and pray that it grows from strength to strength. </span></i></p> <p><i><span style="COLOR: black; ">Richard Nathaniel (Pastor, Eastbury Baptist Church) </span></i></p> <p><span>Well, we give all the glory to Jesus, who died for us. And we want to share his Gospel with people while they are alive to receive it. We would like to see them refreshed by this Gospel. We would like to keep them alive longer and healthier. We are seeing that Jesus through his church will bring healing to the lost, and we are his hands and feet here in South Africa. </span></p> <p><span>Yours in Christ,</span></p> <p><span>Rick Gutierrez</span></p> Wed, 09 Mar 2005 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/1133-rejoice-your-names-are-written-in-the-book-of-life https://internationalministries.org/read/1133-rejoice-your-names-are-written-in-the-book-of-life The Tools of Discovery are Here <p><span>Back in the late 1980s and early 90s I worked for Dr. Wei-Zen Wei at the Michigan Cancer Foundation in Detroit, Michigan.We were searching for ways of immunizing mice against a virus, which caused breast cancer in them, the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV).This virus is a retrovirus, similar in respects to the virus that causes AIDS, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).Wei-Zen is a very kind immigrant from Taiwan.Dr. Wei is a Christian woman; unusual for the part of the world she came from. Our primary objective was to develop a vaccine against the virus, which caused breast cancer in mice. For anybody who has tried this kind of work, they know that it is very difficult. I loved this work and the challenge of designing and doing experiments and working with mice. Sometimes I felt discouraged about killing so many mice and injecting them with tumors and vaccines which were not very benign treatments, or doing procedures on them or in essence infecting them with this virus that partially depleted their immune system. Yet the Lord was with me and I felt his peace at times and realized the importance for people that our research might produce. We learned much from these experiments, and today Dr. Wei-Zen Wei is heading to Stockholm to work with her collaborators there on clinical trials of a vaccine for human breast cancer, a so called DNA vaccine. She has stuck diligently to the breast cancer vaccine work, and was always willing to share the credit for her discoveries with myself and other scientists. She reflected the generosity and humility of spirit with comes from knowing Jesus and serving him.</span></p> <p><span>A lot of my work involved tissue culture and working with living cells, and this required a lot of materials. I would hazard a guess that each day in the lab I used about $500 - $1000 dollars worth of resources in my research efforts. That is the price of discovery; it requires sacrifice of wealth and time.Some of our tools were from the Falcon company, and their motto was "The Tools of Discovery". Whenever a shipment of Falcon pipettes arrived in the lab, I would announce with a sense of irony that "The Tools of Discovery are Here!"As anybody who has done basic medical research knows, discoveries are not easy to come by or frequent occurrences.We had the greatest tools that money could buy for our research, including a flow cytometer, ultracentrifuges, a nude mouse facility (a sterile environment for an immunodepressed breed of mice, a cesium irradiator (a personal favorite of mine), an electron microscope facility, all kinds of chemical and immunology materials and even drugs like IL-2 which were far more valuable than gold by weight.The purchase of this equipment and supplies was donated by people who joined together to reduce suffering and loss for other people.We used these materials in a careful and highly planned out manner. We were paid very little for the amount of training and effort the work involved. This was work done for the love of science, craftsmanship, and the esprit of the laboratory. For me, it was also for the fear of God, who made all things wonderfully.Along the way, God did bless us with some real discoveries, which kept the lab funded and contributed to the knowledge of the field of immunology and breast cancer research. </span></p> <p><span>Now I am 38, and I feel in ways that I am 23 again and working back in the lab in Detroit. My wife Dr. Anita is my collaborator now. We are operating at a fraction of the cost of doing research I did fifteen years back.The Lord has revealed to us through Scripture, mentors, and visions that we are to build up the Body of Christ using health evangelism.We are using tools of medicine, science, evangelism, bible study, and in the fear of the Lord we are proceeding to make disciples of persons with none to very little education in the sciences.We are teaching our lay health builders to screen their neighbors for preventable diseases like heart disease, diabetes, stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, central obesity, nicotine addiction, and HIV.They are using equipment, which costs about $500 dollars total for each team. We could screen for all these diseases for about $6 a person in disposable tests.Like a gold miner in Sutter's Mill California in 1849 or the Witwatersrand near Johannesburg here in South Africa a few years later, we find ourselves standing in the place with perhaps the greatest concentrations of these diseases in the world in our Indian and Zulu communities. The gold is the potential for healing and prevention of disease in mind, body and spirit in this life and eternal life through Jesus Christ.Our fellow prospectors are our lay health builders and the people in their churches empowered for ministry.Our "Tools of Discovery" are the Bible, and hand held instruments, which we can carry in a small briefcase from door to door where we are invited to minister. This is not a fixed laboratory, but rather a moving laboratory much like Jesus sending out the 72 disciples in Luke 10. We are helping people to find out if they have diseases and then letting them know what they can do to prevent disease and/or its complications and premature death.We are bringing them the information discovered by many researchers like Dr. Wei and helping people to apply it to their lives.When people wonder, we tell them about the life and healing that we have found in Jesus and invite them to experience it for themselves.</span></p> <p><span>We are trusting in Jesus that the vision he has set us to will become a mighty tree which bears much fruit.We thank the churches who love Jesus and the people who have provided the funding for our "Tools of Discovery."We praise Jesus for the gifts that he has placed into our fellow prospectors for Kingdom Gold, El Dorado! I pray that Hindus, Moslems, and Zulu animists will come to know the living Jesus, and that even we can be agents of his healing touch in their lives. </span></p> <p><span>Please keep those Tools of Discovery coming, so we can equip more prospectors for Kingdom Gold.To God Be the Glory!</span></p> <p><span>Moving on from mice to Men,</span></p> <p><span>Rick Gutierrez</span></p> <p><i><span>Then Jesus came to them and said, "All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you.And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age."Matthew 28:18 - 20</span></i></p> Mon, 31 May 2004 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/1132-the-tools-of-discovery-are-here https://internationalministries.org/read/1132-the-tools-of-discovery-are-here Speaking the Truth in Love <p><span>A few months ago, Pastor Kris Govender described the situation in his church in Phoenix, South Africa when he said, "We shake each others hands each Sunday and we each ask, ‘How are you?' and respond with ‘I'm fine.' But the reality is that we are not fine."Many South African Indians have poorly controlled blood pressure and undiagnosed diabetes and suffer from high rates of early heart attacks.During the past year we have spent time with pastors, doctors, nurses and lay people in the Durban area and have been asking the question, "What are the unmet health needs of our communities and what can our churches do to help meet those needs?"From our discussions it is becoming clear that with proper training, members of local churches can screen for common health conditions and provide holistic education to their communities.</span></p> <p><span>Pastor Jacob Moses established the Bethany School of Mission one year ago and every three months offers a weeklong mission workshop for lay people in area Christian churches.He invited Rick and me to present a weeklong workshop on Church Based Health Ministry and Heart Healthy living hosted by the Bethany School at Tongaat Baptist Church.The 20-hour workshop was held mornings from December 1 to 5, 2003.I led the Church Based Health Ministry Bible study and Rick taught the <img src="/uploaded/workshop.jpg" alt="" />Heart Healthy Living portion of the course.Sometimes, people are under the illusion that an "expert" like a doctor has all the answers and that they have nothing to contribute.Through words and deeds we made it clear throughout the week that God has given talent, resources, training and insights to everyone and that in order to come to a more perfect understanding of how God is calling us to build his kingdom we have to be willing to share with and receive from each other.We examined Gospel texts which illustrate how Christ is a model of a holistic healer and talked about how we see that he still heals today.The connection between sin and illness from a biblical perspective was examined.We discussed how God was calling His church today to be the healing body of Christ and what barriers stand in the way of fulfilling this call.We also studied what Christ teaches us about financially sustainable health ministry.</span></p> <p><span>During the week, Rick met with each course participant individually and offered them the following screening tests:blood sugar, cholesterol, blood pressure, waist-to-hip ratio (for central obesity assessment) and Body-mass index (calculation of weight and height as a screen for obesity).Seventy-five percent of those screened tested positive on one or more of the above screening tests indicating that they were personally at increased risk for cardiovascular disease.</span></p> <p><span>After an extensive literature review, Rick compiled a booklet for the students that contained a summary text on a holistic approach to prevention of heart disease and diabetes and their complications.The booklet also included 80 pages of supporting newspaper, internet and scientific articles for students who had a special interest in a given area and for those who wanted to see supporting data.Rick used drawings, photographs and straight-forward explanations to illustrate to the class how high insulin levels, high cholesterol, high blood sugar, central obesity, high blood pressure, low levels of physical activity, the wrongs fats, and excess calories damage the body.He showed how exercise and a proper diet could prevent or reverse the damage.He also reviewed how integrating this information with regular rest, study of God's word, and the grace of Christ can help us to lead healthier lives.The students responded with the following comments:"No one has ever explained this to me before.""If my late husband and I had known this information years ago, my husband would have followed these recommendations and might still be alive today.""I know I need to walk but I don't have a walking partner.I am going to pray about this.""I went home yesterday and told my brother why his weight was dangerous and that he needed to make some changes."</span></p> <p><span>On the last day of the course, we gave the students an exam.Some of the students were highly apprehensive about taking the test and so we handed out the multiple-choice portion of the exam in advance and then gave some additional bonus questions on the day of the exam.The students did well on the exam.One woman said, "I never thought at my age that I could learn in a classroom setting but this course has proven to me that I can."A Mediterranean style lunch was followed by a small graduation ceremony organized by Pastor Jacob with a devotional by Pastor Samuel Isaac.Certificates were handed out to the eight students who completed the course.</span></p> <p><span>Thank you to all who prayed for God's blessing on us and the course participants.God did indeed answer our prayers.Let us continue to pray so that, "Speaking the truth in love, we will in all things grow up into him who is the Head, that is, Christ.From him the whole body, joined together and held together by every supporting ligament, grows and builds itself up in love, as each part does its work."Ephesians 4:15-16. </span></p> <p><span>In His service,</span></p> <p><span>Anita and Rick Gutierrez</span></p> Sun, 04 Jan 2004 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/1129-speaking-the-truth-in-love https://internationalministries.org/read/1129-speaking-the-truth-in-love