International Ministries

White - International Ministries The latest from Jeanine and Walt White https://internationalministries.org/teams/112-white.rss 40 Years! <p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:UseFELayout/> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--></p><p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" LatentStyleCount="156"> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if !mso]><object classid="clsid:38481807-CA0E-42D2-BF39-B33AF135CC4D" id=ieooui></object> <style> st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } </style> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} </style> <![endif]--> </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-ansi-language:EN-AU" lang="EN-AU">On June 6<sup>th</sup>, Jeanine and I celebrate the fortieth anniversary of our appointment by International Ministries.&nbsp; Forty is a significant number in our Scriptures.&nbsp; A few examples follow.&nbsp; Jesus was in the wilderness forty days.&nbsp; Moses was in the wilderness forty years with the Israelites!&nbsp; Before that he was also in exile forty years, after forty years of preparation in Egypt.&nbsp; Moses was even on the mountain to receive the two stone tablets for forty days.&nbsp; </span><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;"></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-ansi-language:EN-AU" lang="EN-AU">Over these last forty years, we have sometimes wondered if we were wandering in the wilderness.&nbsp; Each time God resoundingly communicated the same message: “Carry on. I have sent you.&nbsp; Do not get distracted.” &nbsp;And you who have supported us over these last forty years have never wavered.</span><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;"></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-ansi-language:EN-AU" lang="EN-AU">&nbsp;Unlike Moses, we have not been limited to seeing the promises of God materialize in the distance.&nbsp; Instead, we have had the privilege of having front row seats in the most magnificent drama we could have imagined.&nbsp; And we have had the unspeakable privilege of being able to walk with some amazing people through their wilderness and temptations as they made their journey to faith in Jesus.</span><span style="font-size:12.0pt; font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;"></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-ansi-language:EN-AU" lang="EN-AU">&nbsp;We look back with overwhelming joy and gratitude.&nbsp; Over and over again we have had the rare privilege of divine assurance that we are exactly where God wants us to be at exactly the right time doing exactly what God wants us to do.&nbsp; God, working directly and through you who are our partners in prayer and financial support along with the leadership of International Ministries, and the Australian Baptists, who have so graciously received us as one of their own, has made these last forty years ministry possible.&nbsp; </span><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;"></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-ansi-language:EN-AU" lang="EN-AU">With hearts so full of joy and gratitude that it is causing my eyes to overflow, </span><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;"></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; line-height:normal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-ansi-language:EN-AU" lang="EN-AU">Walt and Jeanine</span><span style="font-size:12.0pt; font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;"></span></p> <p></p> Sun, 05 Jun 2016 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/62304-40-years- https://internationalministries.org/read/62304-40-years- IM Announces that Jeanine White is Returning to Global Service <p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> <span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">Jeanine White from Yuba City, California, has been appointed by American Baptist International Ministries (IM) to serve as a Global Consultant. Jeanine will serve in partnership with her husband, Walt White, a current IM global consultant. The Whites' home church is First Baptist Stockton in Stockton, California.</span><u5:p></u5:p></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> <u5:p><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt;"><br></span></u5:p></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u5:p><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">Jeanine will join Walt in working with historically under-served people groups. Together, they will teach and train international partners, including cross-cultural workers, pastors and local leaders, to be more effective in communicating the good news of Jesus Christ. <u5:p></u5:p></span></u5:p></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> <br></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">Jeanine’s work will include a ministry with women and children to help them overcome s<span style="letter-spacing: -0.05pt;">ocial and cultural obstacles. She will teach skills for dealing constructively </span>with the challenges and opportunities of life.</span></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">Walt, from his many years of experience, has been developing and teaching new material to help workers understand and transcend the limits of their own worldview as they seek to make disciples of Jesus Christ. <u5:p></u5:p></span></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> <span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">The couple has a deep passion to increase the longevity of cross-cultural workers and to strengthen their effectiveness and length of service<span style="letter-spacing: -0.05pt;">, so that they may transform lives in a holistic way.<u5:p></u5:p></span></span></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> <br></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;">“I was an IM missionary working with my husband, Walt, when I left active missionary service in 1993 to meet family obligations,” explained Jeanine. “Now that these obligations are completed, I am returning to serve with Walt. The experiences I’ve had in the meantime have given me more understanding in a variety of areas to equip me to be more effective in this service.”</span></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> <span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">When asked why she feels called to this ministry, Jeanine said, “I will be available to listen to other women in cross-cultural service. I will offer encouragement for families living in countries where demands on women are difficult. As a licensed occupational therapist with years of experience in pediatrics, I may help them to understand their children’s needs from my experience. And I am able to offer hope, as our family is a testimony to what God can do.”</span><u5:p></u5:p></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> <span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt;"><br></span></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">Please join IM in celebrating this new appointment and in praying for Jeanine and Walt as they invite others to join them and “strengthen&nbsp;your feeble arms and weak knees. Make level paths for your feet so that the lame may not be disabled, but rather healed.” (Hebrews 12:12-13) </span><u5:p></u5:p></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> <br></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">You may send words of encouragement and communicate directly with Jeanine at <a href="mailto:jeanine.white@internationalministries.org"><font color="#0000ff">jeanine.white@internationalministries.org</font></a>. Learn more about Jeanine on the IM website: <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/teams/112-white"><font color="#0000ff">http://www.internationalministries.org/teams/112-white</font></a>. You may also find <a href="https://www.facebook.com/JeanineOT?fref=ts">Jeanine</a> and&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/walter.white.528316?fref=ts&amp;ref=br_tf">Walter</a> on Facebook.</span><u5:p></u5:p></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> <b><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 9pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;">American Baptist International Ministries</span></b><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 9pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"> <b>is celebrating 200 years of ministry in 2014.</b> Organized in 1814 as the first Baptist international mission agency in America, IM began its pioneer mission work in Burma and today works in Asia, Africa, Europe, the Middle East and the Americas serving more than 1,800 long-term and short-term missionaries. Its central mission is to help people come to faith in Jesus, grow in their relationships with God and change their worlds through the power of the Holy Spirit. IM works with respected partners in over 70 countries in ministries that meet human need. <u5:p></u5:p></span></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> <br></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: normal;"><u5:p><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 10pt;">&nbsp;</span></u5:p><i><font face="Calibri">For more information, contact Catherine Nold: </font></i><a href="mailto:catherine.nold@internationalministries.org"><i><font color="#0000ff" face="Calibri">catherine.nold@internationalministries.org</font></i></a></p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> <br></p><p> <u5:p></u5:p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><i>&nbsp;</i></p><p> </p><p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><i>&nbsp;</i></p><p> </p> Mon, 08 Dec 2014 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/56673-im-announces-that-jeanine-white-is-returning-to-global-service https://internationalministries.org/read/56673-im-announces-that-jeanine-white-is-returning-to-global-service Beheadings and Our Hearts <p> </p><p>A pregnant woman in Sudan is sentenced to death for converting to Christianity. Ultimately, she was saved from the executioner, as countless followers of Jesus prayed and mounted a campaign encouraging diplomatic efforts, but others, unknown to all but a few and God, die. Christians in many places are suffering unspeakable horrors. Even before the videos of beheadings, Christians were claiming that ISIS had beheaded other Christians, even children. Countless other Christians live as second class citizens in the very places where the Christian faith first took root and flourished. A recent Pew Foundation study asserts that the most persecuted group in the world today are Christians, and persecution is not limited to one or two regions or even one continent or from one religion. (I have not read the study myself, only quotations). Some countries that decry the violence against Christians as being contrary to their religion still do not allow Christians to worship in their country. </p><p> </p><p>We find ourselves nauseated and confused by the news reports, and at best, many of us simply want to turn away to the beauty that God has lavished upon us in this world. It is too easy simply to hate or even ignore those who are committing such evil. Yet, if Jesus were to tell the story of the “Good Samaritan” today, who would he pick as the hated neighbor? If we are still to love our enemies, who would that be? What does love for our neighbor really mean? </p><p> </p><p>Love for our neighbor does not mean feeling “warm and fuzzy” toward everyone as our cultural definition of love would have us think. Neither does it mean an uncritical acceptance of all behaviour, and especially criminal behaviour, simply because “that is their way.” We recognize that we live in a fallen world that is NOT what God meant it to be or wants it to be, including our own culture. </p><p> </p><p>Love in the Biblical sense is a commitment to acting in the best interest of the other. Part of that means protecting those who cannot protect themselves. I still do not know how to reconcile that with Jesus’ teaching of non-violence, but we have seen an amazing demonstration of the power of non-violent intervention in the saving of the Sudanese woman. What was invisible was the extreme power of prayer. </p><p> </p><p>Do we pray for our enemies? I need to more! A wise woman responding to one of my presentations said, ”When we pray for someone, they can no longer be our enemy.“ I believe it was Father Berrigan, who said, “We must be as committed to doing good as the evil are to doing evil.” Who is most committed today? </p><p> </p><p>These are the two months when we have a special opportunity to re-commit ourselves to the work of God around the world. God has invited International Ministries into some remarkable opportunities to partner with God and what God is doing through his people around the world. Jeanine and I are deeply blessed to have been a part of International Ministries for these many years. I am up to 38 </p><p>continuous years, and I cannot express how grateful I am for the opportunities God has given me. </p><p> </p><p>Meanwhile, the lives of Jeanine and Walt have been extremely hectic, but we did take time out between meetings in Australia for a wonderful vacation with friends. But none of the urgent tasks such as thanking each one of you got completed during that rest. However, please, please do not think that we are not hugely grateful for your support. Also, we are grappling with the decision of where to live, as our eldest daughter moved to Germany. Please pray for that decision and its implementation! </p><p> </p><p>Serving Christ with you, Walt and Jeanine White </p> Sun, 28 Sep 2014 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/55715-beheadings-and-our-hearts https://internationalministries.org/read/55715-beheadings-and-our-hearts Death by Cold <p>“I’m freezing to death!”&nbsp; We say it so easily.&nbsp; So glibly.&nbsp; I said it.&nbsp; Record breaking cold hit Bangladesh a couple of weeks ago, the coldest in over 50 years and certainly the coldest since independence, over forty years ago.&nbsp; I was prepared for cool weather, but not the bitter cold.&nbsp; It did not freeze.&nbsp; It never does in Bangladesh, but it was down to 36 F.&nbsp;&nbsp; Where I was, it was only 46 F, not too cold by most standards.&nbsp; But it was not just an unusually low temperature that made it cold.&nbsp; It was a wet, foggy, windy cold.&nbsp; I do not know what the wind chill factor was, but it made the cold inescapable.&nbsp;&nbsp; No building or house has a heater, as for most of the year the heat is oppressive, so there was no place to get warm.<br><br>I had the luxury of having layers and layers of clothes to wear, a warm jacket and a building to take refuge in.&nbsp; But I was still cold, and I complained,&nbsp; “Man, I’m freezing to death!”&nbsp; Then I began to hear reports of those that had ACTUALLY died.&nbsp; Reportedly, at least 300 people died in Bangladesh, but the actual count no one will know.&nbsp; Why?&nbsp; No warm clothes, and no warm blankets.&nbsp; Houses made of woven strips of bamboo designed to let air slip through offered virtually NO protection.&nbsp; The elderly, those ill or suffering malnutrition and children were most vulnerable.&nbsp; We worry in America about our excessive body fat index, but most of those that died had no fat to measure!&nbsp; No body insulation meant that the cold penetrated deeply, and with no way or place to get warm, quickly one’s internal body temperature would drop, and the “gripping cold” became a death grip. <br><br>&nbsp;I say many other things glibly, too, such as, “Life is full of choices.”&nbsp; But for many, it is not.&nbsp; Countless people do not get the opportunity to choose such basic things as where they live, what their job will be, whom they marry, or even the God they worship.&nbsp; For all of these choices, one must have options.&nbsp; For many, life is simply thrust upon them, and one must simply bear one’s lot.<br><br>&nbsp;I believe God wants each person to have the opportunity to be free from such things as hunger and cold.&nbsp; It is quite simply part of what we pray when we say, “Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done…”&nbsp; And it also means that God wants each person to have the freedom, the option, to choose to know and follow Christ.&nbsp; Thank you for your support so that NO ONE is left out in the cold!<br><br>Yours with deepest gratitude, <br><br>Walt White</p> Tue, 05 Feb 2013 21:34:32 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/46766-death-by-cold https://internationalministries.org/read/46766-death-by-cold Thank You for Supporting the River Gypsy Project in Bangladesh <p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:OfficeDocumentSettings> <o:AllowPNG/> </o:OfficeDocumentSettings> </xml><![endif]--></p><p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>JA</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark/> <w:EnableOpenTypeKerning/> 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mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Cambria","serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} </style> <![endif]--> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:center" align="center"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;" lang="EN-AU">RIVER GYPSIES: A “FLUID” PEOPLE</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;" lang="EN-AU">A development worker among the“River Gypsy Community (Bede)” in Bangladesh was admiring a new baby, less than a month old, of a beneficiary.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>She thought to ask where the baby had been born.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>The mother replied, “In Delhi, (India),” which was over a thousand miles away! <span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp;</span>The worker was further amazed to find that the mother had traveled on foot, by bus, train and boat to move that thousand miles since the little one’s birth just 4 weeks earlier.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;" lang="EN-AU">Leaders of the Bede community approached me years ago asking to give them opportunities for development that they had seen offered to other poor people groups with whom we work.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>Rather than being hated, the leaders had also found a unique respect from our development workers.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>I took this as a Macedonian call.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>YOU stepped up, and this is mission project was fully funded in 2012.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>I want to say thank you myself, and on their behalf and let you know that we are continuing with the project into 2013 and beyond!<span style="mso-spacerun:yes"><br></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;" lang="EN-AU">Gypsy or nomadic communities present unique challenges for development workers everywhere.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>We discovered quickly that it was impossible to run a normal literacy class.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>A somewhat different group showed up for class each week.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>The first lesson had to be repeated every week!<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>Finally, one committed worker volunteered to move with the itinerant community, living in a tent made of bamboo bows and black plastic sheets.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>But he discovered that even then, the group was like a pool with water running in and water running out, and the pool never remained static.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;" lang="EN-AU">The intriguing Bede community presents many other significant and unique challenges.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>One of the things we teach is the legal rights of women, and in particular those dealing with marriage.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>But few if any of their marriages are registered, and a few clan leaders meet every year and decide who should be married to whom depending upon various factors, including how they seem to be getting along.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>So not only are groups within the clans fluid, but so are marriages!</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;" lang="EN-AU">Traditionally, these people lived only on boats, and owned no land.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>They would disembark to perform shows with snakes and mongooses fighting, use their “powers” to find lost articles like jewellery lost with bathing in ponds, and catching nuisance snakes.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>Their women would sell costume jewellery door-to-door.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>But television meant that entertainment was easily accessible, and people lost interest in snake versus mongoose fights and magic shows.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>The changing society meant that now men could engage in door-to-door sales, whereas before only these “gypsy” women had that freedom of movement.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>They were forced to abandon their traditional lifestyle to survive, but had few skills to live on land, like gardening or tending animals, and little knowledge of sanitation.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span></span></p><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;" lang="EN-AU">Our job is not to change the Bede's culture, but to give them more skills to survive and even thrive, so that they can make informed decisions regarding how to adapt. We give them knowledge they did not have access to before, so that their lives can be transformed.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span>Thank you for providing them these opportunities that they simply would not have except for people like you.</span> <br></p> Thu, 29 Nov 2012 13:56:32 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/45703-thank-you-for-supporting-the-river-gypsy-project-in-bangladesh https://internationalministries.org/read/45703-thank-you-for-supporting-the-river-gypsy-project-in-bangladesh Sand Castles <p>Dear Friends,<br><br>Little landslides of sand crumbled into the swirling water.&nbsp; I remembered exuberant days as a child, building sandcastles&nbsp; at the beach.&nbsp; How long would the “castle” be able to resist the onslaught of the waves?&nbsp; I watched with a mix of delight and a tinge of sadness as my little creation was absorbed back into the endless expanse of ocean and sand.&nbsp; But on this day, no delight lifted the heaviness of my heart, as I watched the sand tumble into the water.&nbsp; There was no anticipation of making another castle when the tide went out.&nbsp; I was watching the Old Brahmaputra River gnaw at the land and homes of very poor people on the edge of Jamalpur, where Jeanine and I had begun to raise our family years ago.<br><br>Jesus said, “The wise man built his house upon the rock.”&nbsp; But what if there are no rocks?&nbsp; Bangladesh is the world’s largest delta region.&nbsp; And what if you cannot afford to feed your children, let alone buy land on high, safe ground away from the river?&nbsp; What if you have put a school out among those people, so that their children could escape the endless downward spiral, and that school has already been consumed by the fickle appetite of the river?&nbsp; Sometimes, the natural forces that work against people are overwhelming.&nbsp; One woman took a loan from a village cooperative for only $55 to stock her shop, but now the river has erased her shop from the landscape.&nbsp; It will be very hard for her to pay back money. &nbsp;<br><br>International Ministries some years ago committed to empowering people living on these sand bars and in others ways on the edges of society to break the endless cycle of poverty to which they were condemned.&nbsp; We have taught them the simple skills of reading and writing, and building on the beautiful interdependence already in Bengali culture, taught them how to save and pool their own money and make low interest loans to each other.&nbsp; In eight years, these people who are among the poorest in Bangladesh have been able to save together over $5,000!!! &nbsp;<br><br>As a result they have been able to buy build their own businesses and then their own homes.&nbsp; Some sell bracelets and ornaments to other women, some sell firewood, and some run little shops.&nbsp; Others have purchased cows, sewing machines, or rickshaws for their husbands.&nbsp; They have been able to supply the wedding costs for girls with no chance of a proper wedding otherwise.&nbsp; They have worked together to make repairs on community assets like roads and paths.&nbsp; Most importantly, their children are in schools. <br><br>Thank you for your commitment to the ongoing empowerment of these people, with occasional emergency disaster recovery help, through your giving to International Ministries, One Great Hour of Sharing, and my own support that makes this kind of involvement in people’s lives possible.<br><br>With deepest gratitude,<br><br>Walt White<br><br>MPT website: <a href="http://www.waltworldwide.org/">www.waltworldwide.org</a><br><br></p> Sun, 05 Aug 2012 15:06:38 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/44173-sand-castles https://internationalministries.org/read/44173-sand-castles Reporting the Death of Anonymous <p>Dear Friends,<br><br>A hero for Christ has died. <br></p><p>Many times during my life, the world has wept when some “celebrity” that has lived a dysfunctional life died prematurely due to an overdose or some other preventable cause. A true hero has just died, no doubt of a heart attack. He was a close friend. His family will weep, and his friends will mourn and reminisce, but the world will utterly ignore his life and his death. His death will not be noted in the New York Times, or perhaps even in the local newspaper in his backwater corner of the world. His is a life that SHOULD be celebrated, but it will be overlooked except for a few. The world will never know his name, although heaven does, as it is no doubt written in the Book of Life. <br></p><p>He might have been an orphan or he might have had a powerful, rather wealthy family. He talked very little about them, either to protect himself, or to protect them from further shame because of the decision he made. Whether his family was dead or alive, he became dead to his immediate and extended family when he became a disciple of Jesus Christ and chose to follow Jesus as his Lord, his Savior. He soon developed a passion to introduce others to the Jesus that he loved. He was well educated in the religious background of his birth, and was extremely skilled in using that knowledge to help others come to faith in Jesus. <br></p><p>He had other gifts that amazed me too. He had traveled his country on a literature distribution team for several years as a young man. It seems that he remembered every single place that he ever had gone, and what's more, he remembered the names of community or family leaders from each of those places! Many times I watched in awe as he met a person from another part of the country for the first time, and as soon as he identified where he was from, my friend established an instant rapport using that incredible memory to best advantage. He was a wonderful example of what can happen through a life lived passionately for Jesus. His heritage will live in the fine children that he fathered. But beyond that, the impact of his life will continue to multiply through those who came to know Jesus either directly from him or through those he touched. Perhaps no better tribute can be given to any disciple of Jesus Christ than the one that Stephen the Martyr gave to King David: “David, after he had served the purpose of God in his own generation, died…” <br></p><p>Thank you for your faithfulness in enabling me to serve the purpose for which God has called me, and may you too remain faithful to the purpose to which God has called you. With gratitude to God for untold numbers of anonymous citizens, yes, heroes of the Kingdom of God.<br><br>Blessings,<br>Walt<br><br>P.S. I want to thank each of you for your prayers for my health.&nbsp; God has continued to heal my heart in a miraculous way.&nbsp; My heart no longer shows any damage from the heart attack, and I am back to full health and activity! More on that in a later IM Journal.&nbsp; Thanks be to God!</p><p>Click <a href="http://www.waltworldwide.org/">here</a> to see Walt White MPT Website: <br></p> Tue, 05 Jun 2012 12:42:31 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/43170-reporting-the-death-of-anonymous https://internationalministries.org/read/43170-reporting-the-death-of-anonymous Miracles? <p>Dear Friends,</p><p>I should by all accounts be dead.&nbsp; It was a miracle that I survived one or more heart attacks in Central Asia.&nbsp; One thing a person is NOT supposed to do after a major heart attack is fly long distances, but I flew literally half way around the world after mine.&nbsp; It is a miracle I survived.&nbsp; It took six days after my visit to an American emergency room to diagnose my heart attack, and two more days before I received my two stents and angioplasty.&nbsp; It is a miracle that my heart function more than doubled in the first month following that procedure, after being starved of oxygen for so long and with the amount of scar tissue that had formed.&nbsp; The echocardiogram technician said, “I would call you a walking miracle!”&nbsp; So, I believe in miracles.<br><br>But I am uncomfortable with the term “miracle.”&nbsp; Does it imply that God is not intimately and intricately involved in the world?&nbsp; I am afraid that too often behind that word there is a mistaken assumption that God only gets involved when we yank the emergency cord.&nbsp; And even then, only sometimes!&nbsp; I have been guilty of this myself, but I do not believe that at all anymore.<br><br>Many incidents in the Old Testament repeatedly return to impact me.&nbsp; One of those is when Jacob fled from his home.&nbsp; Having had many pillows in my travels that reminded me of his stone pillow, I have empathy for him!&nbsp; When Jacob awoke in the morning, he realized, “Surely the Lord is in this place—and I did not know it!”&nbsp; How often in my life I have been reminded of that, too.<br><br>God IS involved in this world and even in our lives.&nbsp;&nbsp; As I reflect this Christmas season, is not THIS the message of the Miracle of the Incarnation?!?&nbsp; God came down and got muddy feet so that God could release us from the power of sin, remake US and remake the world with us.<br><br>Thank you once again for joining with me, praying for me and supporting me, as God continues to work in me and through me.&nbsp; Let us continue throughout the year to celebrate the Miracle of the Incarnation, and the miracle of Immanuel, God with Us.<br><br>With deepest gratitude,<br><br>Walt<br><br>MPT Website:&nbsp; <a href="http://www.waltworldwide.org">www.waltworldwide.org</a><br><br></p> Wed, 28 Dec 2011 11:53:16 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/40927-miracles- https://internationalministries.org/read/40927-miracles- A Baby was Crying <p>“A baby was crying for hours, and so I couldn’t get to sleep last night.”&nbsp; My friend, a missionary working in southern Africa, had asked a man how he was, as one does, when the fellow arrived at his house to do some work.&nbsp; The man went on to complain again, “The baby just wouldn’t stop crying, but finally it died.”&nbsp; My friend was startled and appalled by such a comment, and asked, “Was the baby sick? What did it die from?”&nbsp; The other man answered, “No, not sick.&nbsp; My neighbor had a baby girl last night.&nbsp; They did not want another baby, and could not take care of another child, so they threw her down a dry well.&nbsp; But she just wouldn’t die.&nbsp; It took hours, and she kept crying, and really messed up my sleep.”<br><br>My friend was stunned, and finally asked, “Baba, why didn’t you go save the baby?” The man had a look of puzzlement on his face, and said, “You just don’t understand.&nbsp; I cannot take care of my own problems.&nbsp; Why would I want to take someone else’s problem?”<br><br>My friend said, “Baba, if something like this ever happens again, you must come tell me first. We will find a way to take care of the baby.”&nbsp; The other man’s last words as he walked away were, “You just don’t understand.”<br><br>Clearly, we have much work to do in order to make known how much we value human life and are willing and able to offer help to save others.&nbsp; The murder of children (or anyone!) is always wrong, but we must seek to understand the reasons for such desperate acts to bring Heaven’s values to earth.&nbsp; When we pray, “Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven” we are committing ourselves to join with God in taking action to make sure that God’s will IS done.&nbsp; We must do as much as we can in the short term to stop terrible and unacceptable tragedies like this, but we cannot simply stop with Band Aids.&nbsp; This is why we want to empower people economically, so they can feed their children.&nbsp; This is why we are compelled to tell the Good News of the God that loves and cares.<br><br>When a person believes that God is remote, weak or unmoved by human suffering, there is no hope.&nbsp; The simple transition to knowing and coming into relationship with the God of the Bible, who is close, powerful and loving, gives hope.&nbsp; And hope changes everything.<br><br>A big chunk of my work is helping cross cultural workers put together appropriate ways to address such issues.&nbsp; A huge problem is that we indeed do NOT understand, and we must spend a great deal of time and effort in listening and learning, or we never get deep enough for real change to occur.&nbsp; That must be done first before a culturally appropriate and therefore effective long term response can be formulated.&nbsp; We must be extremely careful that what we do actually meets the local people’s needs in the best way, and is not designed simply to make us feel better.&nbsp; Another part of my job is caring for the workers whose hearts are cut to shreds by meeting incidents like the one just related, and who are dealing with poverty, disease and death constantly.<br><br>This is the time of year when many churches receive the World Mission Offering. The World Mission Offering keeps missionaries where God has called them.&nbsp; And it helps support our local partners, so we can join together in changing this world into what God wants it to be.&nbsp; Thank you for partnering with me through your prayers and financial support, as I also share in what God with God’s people is doing in a variety of places and with a variety of people.&nbsp; (II Cor. 6:1).<br><br>Yours in Christ,<br><br>Walt White<br><br>MPT Website: <a href="http://www.waltworldwide.org">www.waltworldwide.org</a><br></p> Mon, 24 Oct 2011 00:40:06 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/39836-a-baby-was-crying https://internationalministries.org/read/39836-a-baby-was-crying Murder, Revenge, or …? Dear Friends, <br><br>Osama bin Laden is dead.&nbsp; The news broke while I was in the largest Muslim country in the world, and while I was in an area that is 98+ percent Muslim.&nbsp; After receiving this news, we proceeded with our plans to go to a restaurant for dinner.&nbsp; We did not fear for our lives.<br><br>I was not surprised that opinion varied among those interviewed on the local news in that country.&nbsp; Some viewed bin Laden as a victim, some as a criminal, some as a hero, and some as an embarrassment.&nbsp; Most Muslims feel that bin Laden has besmirched the name of Islam, and is in fact, not even a true Muslim. What has interested me more are the range of comments that are coming from other places.&nbsp; I know that when speaking on a politicized event, one risks losing friends.&nbsp; However, I am of the view that it should in fact be with our friends that we are able to share our reflections on difficult issues, and so I proceed in that spirit.<br><br>My first observation is that among those who are calling this event a “murder”, every single one of them, regardless of location or religion, lives in a country where their police carry guns, and periodically use them with lethal results.&nbsp; When a madman begins shooting schoolchildren, as happened right next door to my church some years ago, the question is never, “Should we let him keep on shooting children?” but rather is, “Where were the police?&nbsp; Why couldn’t they have gotten there faster?”&nbsp; Nor when such a maniac is killed as he is firing on children does anyone raise the word “revenge” or even “murder.”&nbsp; We are always grateful when a very troubled person is arrested before they can execute their plans for destruction. Bin Laden confessed to his crimes, was a repeat offender, and was actively inciting and planning more acts of violence.<br><br>My second observation is that people often say that we live in a hopelessly corrupt world.&nbsp; Christians confess that humans are sinful.&nbsp; We therefore are often confronted with only bad options.&nbsp; Violence is one of them.&nbsp; However, I personally would prefer that the American government (or the English, or Mexican, or German, or French, or Australian—simply insert your favorite “culprit” government) be choosing who will live and who will die rather than Osama bin Laden.&nbsp; It is not the exercise of power that is wrong, rather it is the unjust exercise of power.&nbsp; I want to go on record as being full of gratitude to all of those who have given themselves to protect those who are unable to protect themselves: police, firefighters, the military, and others who go unnamed. <br><br>But is the world “hopelessly” corrupt?&nbsp; I do not believe so.&nbsp; We have in the Christian world just celebrated the greatest victory over corruption, tyranny, unjustness, and indeed DEATH that history has ever witnessed: the Resurrection of Jesus the Messiah!&nbsp;&nbsp; So while criminal activity cannot be tolerated, this is not the ultimate battle.&nbsp; Terrorism is a set of ideas.&nbsp; We are ultimately and over the long term in a struggle of ideas and God has revealed the Truth!!!&nbsp; For all of us who regret the death of anyone, and for all of us who want justice for all, recent events should be a searing reminder of the urgency of the task of calling all to be disciples of Jesus, the Risen One.<br><br>I am often asked, “Who will win this struggle?”&nbsp; I know who will over the long term, as I do read the Bible.&nbsp; But in the short term, I fear it will go to those who are most committed.&nbsp; Will that be us?&nbsp; What will be the response of those who follow Jesus?&nbsp; <br><br>I am recommitting myself to pray for my enemies.&nbsp; I am also strengthening my commit to love my others in a way that will reach their hearts with the love of God in Jesus Christ.&nbsp; As you pray for me, I invite you to join me in these commitments. <br><br>Yours in the name of the Living One,<br><br>Walt White<br><br>MPT Website: <a href="http://www.waltworldwide.org">www.waltworldwide.org</a><br> Wed, 04 May 2011 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/35552-murder-revenge-or- https://internationalministries.org/read/35552-murder-revenge-or- “It Tastes Like Chicken” Dear Friends, <br><br>I was invited recently by some new aboriginal friends in outback Australia to go “bush tuckering.” This means heading into the scrub to look for grub.&nbsp; All of the items they ate for centuries before the coming of Europeans are still to be found for those who know and can see them.&nbsp; They say, “The bush is our supermarket, and everything is on sale!”<br><br>Our friends picked “bush bananas” from a vine that was growing on a small eucalyptus bush.&nbsp; They found “bush tomatoes” on another vine close to the ground.&nbsp; Inside an object that looked something like a wasp’s nest, was a small edible portion, and this they called a “bush coconut.”&nbsp; They found sweet berries.&nbsp; We did not find “bush potatoes” but we did find and they managed to capture a large lizard, or goanna.&nbsp; One lady, sitting on the ground by a campfire, made a small slit in the upper chest of the goanna, and deftly removed the entrails.&nbsp; I wanted to call it “bush arthroscopic surgery!”&nbsp; Roasted in the fire, no joke, it tasted like chicken! We sat under a tree and had a picnic of “bush tucker.”<br><br>Jesus only left two symbols of our unity in Jesus Christ.&nbsp; Baptism is one, and table fellowship where we specifically and intentionally remember his life and death for us, is the other.&nbsp; Nothing communicates love and acceptance like sitting down and eating together, whether it is in a home, in church, at a restaurant, or sitting in the dust under a tree.<br><br>What, it is fair to ask, has this to do with my work? Each year I teach prospective, new and returning cross cultural workers in Australia.&nbsp; Most principles are the same, regardless of the ethnic group in which we minister, and this time I was asked to be with the team leaders (husband and wife) of the Australian Baptist’s work with the “First Australians” (aborigines).&nbsp; The vision statement for the Australian Baptist mission agency is “Empowering communities to develop their own distinctive ways of following Jesus.”&nbsp; So in line with this vision, my job is to be a pastor and strategist for missionaries and development workers.&nbsp; Thank you for your prayer and financial support that enables me to be a partner in helping people come to know Jesus.<br><br>Yours in Christ,<br><br>Walt White<br><br>MPT Website: <a href="http://www.waltworldwide.org">www.waltworldwide.org</a><br><br> Sat, 16 Apr 2011 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/35018-it-tastes-like-chicken- https://internationalministries.org/read/35018-it-tastes-like-chicken- Prayers for Egypt and Beyond Dear Friends, <br><br>Tunisian citizens have just overthrown their dictator, and are struggling to shape a democracy out of the rubble.&nbsp; Egypt is in turmoil, and other Middle Eastern governments are no doubt fearing for their political lives.&nbsp; The United States is seeing regimes that have had very positive relations with us in jeopardy, and this is making some people extremely nervous.&nbsp; The truth is, democracy has risks.<br><br>While we advocate freedom and democracy for all, the results are sometimes disturbing when politicians that are from parties or ideologies we do not like are elected into office.&nbsp; This is true both within our own country, and in other countries. While there certainly are questions about the legitimacy of elections in some places, what is our response when people or parties or ideologies that we do not agree with are elected to positions of power?<br><br>Our commitment to freedom of thought grows out of our commitment to freedom of religion.&nbsp; Our Baptist predecessors, along with others from the “non-conformist” churches, realized that the practical application of Jesus’ teaching that we must love our neighbor as ourselves is that if we want freedom of religion and thought, we must grant the same to our neighbor.&nbsp; And that means that if we want the freedom to hold our beliefs although others think we are wrong, then we must also grant that same freedom to others.&nbsp; We must even give others the freedom to be wrong, and that is precisely because of the teachings of Jesus!<br><br>What will the results of the current cataclysmic upheavals be?&nbsp; Will those committed to democracy be able to establish the social institutions necessary to sustain it?&nbsp; Or will those who are happy to use the freedoms of democracy only to establish their own totalitarian system prevail?&nbsp; Will it be one person one vote, or one person one vote only one time?<br><br>Now is the time for intense and committed prayer that God will use this moment in history to bring freedom, and in particular true freedom of religion, along with justice to countless people who have been denied it, and that it will be done through a peaceful process.&nbsp; Pray for the Arab world in particular, that freedom will reign giving equal opportunity for all.&nbsp; Pray that the result will be peace and prosperity for all throughout the Middle East, so each person has the freedom to become all that God has intended for them.<br><br>Watching the news with prayer,<br><br>Walt<br><br>MPT Website: <a href="http://www.waltworldwide.org">www.waltworldwide.org</a><br> Sun, 30 Jan 2011 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/32445-prayers-for-egypt-and-beyond https://internationalministries.org/read/32445-prayers-for-egypt-and-beyond She came for entertainment? Dear friends, <br><br>"She came for entertainment, but found it boring,” I thought.&nbsp; Has God ever surprised you by changing someone you did not expect to change?<br><br>A middle-aged student disappeared after the second week long session of the “School of Abraham” in the Republic of Georgia.&nbsp; I was surprised several years later when I returned for yet more teaching and she was my translator, full of excitement and enthusiasm! She said, “I have been unable to come, because I got a job as a maid in Turkey. I put the lessons that you taught me into practice, and they work!”&nbsp; Never underestimate what God is doing!&nbsp; <br><br>I am sometimes asked, “Should I give to the personal support of an International Ministries worker, or should I give to the World Mission Offering?” The personal support is what enables people like me to fulfill the call that God has placed on our lives. International Ministries has also always been committed to teaching and empowering our partners. The World Mission Offering is what allows many of our partners to put into practice the things we model and teach. International Ministries has always had a remarkable balance, supporting their own workers, but supporting even more workers among our international partners. They are the ones that best know how to implement the training we give, often in creative and unexpected ways.<br><br>We have the privilege of being “co-workers” with God (II Cor 6:1). The question should not be “Which one should I choose?” but rather, “Where and in what way is God wanting me to be his co-worker, or his partner?” That question is best answered by both our hearts and our heads. Emotion-alone driven [instead "Driven by emotion alone...] decisions often meet only our own needs, and do not make the most effective use of our resources. I knew that God had called me to have a special contribution in the Republic of Georgia. My heart burns with excitement about what God is doing and seems to want to do through our amazing sisters and brothers in Georgia. God then confirmed for my head that it is bearing fruit, and is indeed both strategic and effective by seeing the effectiveness of my translator.<br><br>Thank you for both your support for what God is doing through me personally, and for what God is doing throughout the world.&nbsp; If you have not yet joined my missionary partnership network, click <a href="http://www.internationalministries.org/missionaries/112">here</a> to do so via my International Ministries "Profile" webpage.&nbsp; This webpage also provides the easy way for you to provide an on-line donation to my ministry support. <br><br>With deepest gratitude,<br><br>Walt White<br>IM Global Consultant<br> Thu, 21 Oct 2010 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/28120-she-came-for-entertainment- https://internationalministries.org/read/28120-she-came-for-entertainment- Volunteer Doctor Needed in Bangladesh Medical Volunteers needed at Joyramkura Hospital in Bangladesh!<br><br>Joyramkura is a 60 bed hospital that currently only has one doctor present.&nbsp; There are generally 80+ inpatients and 150 or so outpatients per day.&nbsp; In one day, Dr Lucy has already done three C-sections.&nbsp; Major diseases seen are malaria, pneumonia, dysentery. Most surgeries are OB/GYN plus hernias, appendectomies, and simple surgeries like that.<br><br>The hospital can provide food, housing and transportation in country (hospital vehicle).&nbsp; The doctor is needed as soon as possible, and will be needed until mid-October.&nbsp; This is a great hospital with a great ministry!<br><br>Please contact Volunteers in Global Mission at bimvolunteers@abc-usa.org or call 800-222-3872 ext 2366 if you are interested.<br><br> Wed, 28 Jul 2010 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/24189-volunteer-doctor-needed-in-bangladesh https://internationalministries.org/read/24189-volunteer-doctor-needed-in-bangladesh “I Am the Pharisee!” Dear Friends, <br><br>Stunned, I realized, “I am the Pharisee that walked by!”&nbsp; I had passed a baby in a woman’s arms while walking down the street in Bangladesh and thought, “Wow!&nbsp; That baby is in the worst shape that I have seen a child in years.&nbsp; Just a skeleton.&nbsp; Was it even still alive?”&nbsp; Suddenly I pulled up short and stopped like I had walked into a brick wall.&nbsp; How could I just walk by and wonder?&nbsp; That child was on the very verge of death and I had thought of it as on object.&nbsp; I was horrified at myself.&nbsp; I turned around and soon caught up to the family.&nbsp; I took them to the office of our development project and made arrangements for the baby’s medical care. I estimated she was two years old. <br><br>I was surprised that our development agency’s staff did not seem more compassionate.&nbsp; But they had already suspected the terrible truth.&nbsp; I had noticed the mother, father, and older child looked pretty well fed.&nbsp; The parents explained that the child was sick, and that is why her condition was so grim.&nbsp; They also explained that they simply had no money for medicine.&nbsp; When our staff challenged them, the answer was the same.&nbsp; They even produced a prescription.&nbsp; After making all the arrangements for medical care and food and after extracting firm promises that they would return, they were sent off.&nbsp; But they never took the child to the doctor, nor did they return for food!&nbsp; The child was their INCOME.&nbsp; They used her ghastly state of starvation for begging!&nbsp; Was she their own child?&nbsp; Or a kidnapped child?&nbsp; Either way, this is yet another manifestation of that unspeakable crime of human slavery.&nbsp; Thank you for making it possible for me to impact so many places, so that people do not simply have their economic condition improved, but so that their whole relationship with God,&nbsp; their community and their world is transformed.<br><br>Yours in Christ,<br><br>Walt White<br>IM Global Consultant<span id="content-body"></span> Sun, 28 Feb 2010 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/18882-i-am-the-pharisee- https://internationalministries.org/read/18882-i-am-the-pharisee- Who am I? Dear friends, <br><br>Let’s play a game.&nbsp; I will describe some things about a person, and you choose which answer is correct.<br><br>1.&nbsp; I am a musician.&nbsp; I play the piano, and my dream is to play in Memphis.&nbsp; I also play the oboe.&nbsp; My favorite composer is Mozart.&nbsp; I have had to take some other work while I am waiting to be discovered. <br>a.&nbsp; I am a taxi driver in Los Angeles.<br>b.&nbsp; I am a youth director in a church in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.<br>c.&nbsp; I am a waiter in Cairo, Egypt.<br>d.&nbsp; I am a former child prodigy in Singapore.<br><br>2. I have my own television show on which I preach twice a week.&nbsp; I tell off-color jokes in mixed company with barely a formal introduction.&nbsp; I fib a bit about being married when it is convenient.<br>a.&nbsp; I am a tele-evangelist in Colorado.<br>b.&nbsp; I am a teacher in a famous Muslim university in the Middle East.<br>c.&nbsp; I am the Abbot of a monastery in Cambodia.<br>d.&nbsp; I am a Jewish rabbi in New York.<br><br>3. I have a university education.&nbsp; I speak four languages.&nbsp; I am not married, but am working hard to get the money to do so.<br>a.&nbsp; I am a waiter in Cairo.<br>b.&nbsp; I am a camel driver at Mt Sinai.<br>c.&nbsp; I am a hotel receptionist in Egypt.<br>d.&nbsp; I am a tour guide in Egypt.<br><br>The answers are: 1C, 2B, and all the answers are correct for 3.<br><br>I am not sure what pictures come to your mind when you hear the name “Egypt.”&nbsp;&nbsp; Is the presence of around 8 million or more Christians among those? Although I have been to Egypt before, the first time in 1972, my mind was repeatedly jarred by my own perceptions and the people and experiences I encountered.&nbsp; Traffic and pollution problems bigger than the pyramids, the stark beauty of Mt. Sinai, and the vision of ships seeming to sail across the desert as we neared the Suez Canal are all lasting images.<br><br>If you have not visited Egypt yourself, I guarantee that it is a country full of surprises, no matter how much you have read about it.&nbsp; A fact of common knowledge that is nevertheless surprising is that nearly all of Egypt’s 78 million people live along the Nile River in an area of about 15,000 square miles, or about half the size of South Carolina.<br><br>Would it surprise you to know that International Ministries helps to support some excellent development work in “Garbage City” where recycling occurs in some amazingly creative ways?&nbsp; Micro-credit programs with phenomenal repayment records continue to improve the lives of urban poor in dramatic ways.&nbsp; Or would it surprise you to know that next year’s Xtreme Team is planning to Xperience Egypt? Or that I am going to lead it next June and July?&nbsp; International Ministries continues to work in surprising places and surprising ways.&nbsp; I am Xtremely grateful&nbsp; for your support!<br><br>Yours in Christ,<br><br>Walt White<br>IM Global Consultant<br> Wed, 02 Dec 2009 19:00:00 -0500 https://internationalministries.org/read/16000-who-am-i- https://internationalministries.org/read/16000-who-am-i- The Chief Has Nothing to Write Dear Friends, <br><br>When I arrived in Malawi earlier this week, I was met by a Malawian driver who drove me four hours to the town where our team lives. He has worked for us for five years, so I thought I would do a little "appreciative inquiry." <br><br>&nbsp;"You know us inside and out," I said. "What is it that we do really well?"<br><br>Without hesitation, he smiled and said, "You teach the Word of God. You teach it clearly in a way everyone can understand. Not in the national language or in a foreign language. You teach the Word of God in our (tribal) language." <br><br>I went on to ask, "So what? Why is that important? What difference does it make?" <br><br>He laughed and said, "There is a chief in one of our villages. One of the most important jobs of a chief is to solve disputes at the village level. He keeps a book for government inspection of all the disputes, the parties involved and the resolution. He is afraid that he is in trouble, because he now has nothing to write. He says people are not fighting, but forgiving each other. They are helping each other, since they know Jesus and are trying to live like Him. Now, however, he is afraid he will look lazy, and the government inspector won't believe him."<br><br>Several years ago, the theme for International Ministries was "Change Our World". It is happening! Transformed lives are bringing glory to God all over the earth, even in remote Malawian villages.<br><br>Please remember in this season that it is your World Mission Offering that supports the work of our partners who are bringing glory to God in their special parts of the earth.<br><br>Blessings,<br><br>Walt White<br>ABC-IM Global Consultant<br><br>MPT Website: <a href="http://www.waltworldwide.org/">www.waltworldwide.org</a><br><br> Thu, 22 Oct 2009 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/14881-the-chief-has-nothing-to-write https://internationalministries.org/read/14881-the-chief-has-nothing-to-write I’m Calling! Dear friends, <br><br>A woman’s voice called out in French, her voice rising in volume and urgency with each repetition, “Calling.&nbsp; CaLLing! HEY! I’M CALLING!!!”&nbsp; Each time this happened, everyone in the seminar laughed at the funny cell phone ring!&nbsp; Most of the pastors and deacons attending were too poor even to think about owning a cell phone yet, but one school teacher/leader was clearly a bit better off than the others.<br><br>I just spent 11 days in Burundi, getting familiar with their unique situation and teaching between 20 and 30 0f their pastors and deacons.&nbsp; Burundi is a country that has been ripped by civil wars, and is locked in struggle with extreme poverty.&nbsp; Many of the leaders lack a basic education, and only a handful have made it past high school.&nbsp; But Burundi is a superb example of how International Ministries is committed to partnering with believers from other countries.<br><br>The leaders of the Free Baptist Church of Burundi realized they had a very big problem, and needed help.&nbsp; A religion strong in other parts of Africa and long present in their country is becoming dramatically more active.&nbsp; It has seen a recent surge in growth, with all signs pointing toward that growth rate continuing.&nbsp; This religion is well funded and they are sending people into places where they have rarely been seen before to proclaim this “new gospel.”&nbsp; They give away food, clothes, free education and free medical treatment.&nbsp;&nbsp; Many view them as a threat because of other methods they use to convert people to their religion and because of news reports from other parts of Africa. The leadership of the Free Baptists want their people to respond to these people with the love of Christ in such a compelling way that rather than lose people to the other religion, members of the other religion will find the joy of salvation in Jesus Christ.&nbsp; That is the teaching and training that I and an Australian colleague were providing.&nbsp; Our teaching was eagerly sought and gratefully received.&nbsp; The fact that no students left the training during the week seemed evidence to us of the importance the pastors themselves&nbsp; felt.<br><br>I read a book several years ago by an Indian church leader proclaiming a new day in Christian missions.&nbsp; His proposal was that Western missionaries no longer be sent to other countries, because it was far cheaper to support a local worker.&nbsp; However, International Ministries recognized that long ago, and has always been committed to training and supporting local Christians in the proclamation of the Gospel.&nbsp; This is what the World Mission Offering primarily does, and that is why it is still vitally important.&nbsp; The problem is that God calls people far more urgently than the French voice on the cell phone.&nbsp; He calls some to go to their own Jerusalem, some to their Judea, some to a Samaria, and some to the ends of the earth.&nbsp; He calls people through International Ministries and through our cross cultural partners.&nbsp; I am often asked if it is more important to give to the personal support of a missionary, or to the World Mission Offering.&nbsp; The answer is that both are vitally important, because both support people in the way God wants to and is using them.<br><br>Thank you for your support which allows me to minister to partners in the United States, and in extremely hard places like Burundi.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<br><br>Yours in Christ,<br><br>Walt White Wed, 23 Sep 2009 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/14235-i-m-calling- https://internationalministries.org/read/14235-i-m-calling- His name is "Graveyard" Dear friends,<br><br>“His name is Graveyard,” said the young woman in Mozambique, indicating a school age boy.&nbsp; “That’s an unusual name!&nbsp; Is it a family name?” was the best attempt at not saying something even more awkward.&nbsp; “No.&nbsp; My first five children all died before they reached their third birthday.&nbsp; When he was born, I figured he was just headed for the graveyard, too.&nbsp; So that’s what I named him.”<br><br>Malnutrition, AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and “normal” childhood diseases still wreak havoc in the lives of so many people.&nbsp; I was recently in Mozambique.&nbsp; Measles broke out among village children not long ago, and many died of measles. &nbsp;<br><br>“Remember the guy down by the river that several years ago prayed for the first time in his own language?&nbsp; How is he doing?” “Dead,” replied my colleague. “How about the chief that was so interested to know more about Jesus that we visited that afternoon?”&nbsp; “Dead,” came the reply.&nbsp; “How about the guy that went with us, that was so excited to be able to tell others about Jesus?” “Dead, too,” was the heavy hearted reply.<br><br>It is extremely difficult to develop a long-term plan for training and leadership development in such extreme conditions.&nbsp; These are some of the issues that I talk with people about as I visit, in this case in southern Africa.&nbsp; These are also examples of why the Good News that we bring must impact all aspects of a person’s life.&nbsp; This we call holistic ministry, because we believe that God is concerned with the whole person, their whole life, and that the whole world is God’s.<br><br>One development worker recently asked someone on their team what someone coming from the riches of the West really had to say to someone struggling with such poverty.&nbsp; Their local colleague thought quietly for some time, and then said, “When someone like you that has everything still needs God, that shakes us up.&nbsp; That really means something.”<br><br>I suppose we all have our dreams about what heaven will be like, as we try to imagine the unimaginable.&nbsp; Another colleague asked a local friend of his, “What do you think heaven will be like?”&nbsp; Contemplating the thought of heaven awhile, he finally answered, “Heaven?&nbsp; I’ll be able to eat an egg every day.”<br><br>When we pray, “Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven” we are committing ourselves to bring as much of heaven to earth as possible.&nbsp; Or, to say it another way, we are committing ourselves to transform the world into what God intended it to be before sin messed it up.<br><br>Thank you for your partnership in this wonderful task.<br><br>Blessings, Walt White Tue, 09 Jun 2009 20:00:00 -0400 https://internationalministries.org/read/11906-his-name-is-graveyard- https://internationalministries.org/read/11906-his-name-is-graveyard-